Podcast

Episode 424

Jul 22, 2022

You've created a new website. What do you do now to get it launched? Michael and Allissa discuss the steps you should take to make sure everything works correctly.

Listen to "E424: What to Do When Moving to a New Website" on Spreaker.
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EPISODE 424

Weekly Roundup

Discussion Topic

Quick Tips

Sponsors


Transcript: 

Sponsor message:

This episode is sponsored by Happyface. Face cradles can be so uncomfortable for a client and that pressure and stuffiness can ruin the whole massage experience. Happyface is the most comfy face cradle. So you can give the most relaxing massage of your client's life. Innovative, heart-shaped design means no sinus pressure, no eye pressure, no need to adjust mid-massage, no wrinkles or makeup smearing, made in the USA. Happy face is seamless and super easy to clean. It's about the same dimensions as every other face cradle. So your face cradle covers will fit just fine. And the entire back service is covered with Velcro. So it's going to stick on your face cradle frame, wherever you put it. You can get 20% off the entire purchase at massagebusinessblueprint.com/happyface, using code massagebb at checkout, but that's all right there, when you go to massagebusinessblueprint.com/happyface.

Michael Reynolds:

Hey everyone. Welcome to the Massage Business Blueprint Podcast, where we help you attract more clients, make more money, improve your quality of life. I'm Michael Reynolds.

Allissa Haines:

I'm Alissa Haines on a terrible internet signal.

Michael Reynolds:

It got better. I think it got better. I think we're good.

Allissa Haines:

Oh, good. Okay. Well, we'll see.

Michael Reynolds:

Fingers crossed, we will see. Hey everyone, welcome. We're glad you're here to our show today. Alissa, what are you reading today?

Allissa Haines:

So I have been listening to, it's a podcast called This Is Critical, with Virginia Heffernan and I'm really enjoying it. And one of the more recent episodes was called How To Change A Mind. And it was really interesting because it talked about how people think... I can see that my signal's breaking up, and how people think and how they change their minds and how to talk to somebody with a very different opinion than yours, and do so in an effective manner. And it was really good. So I think everyone should listen to This Is Critical, with Virginia Heffernan.

Michael Reynolds:

That sounds really interesting. Especially in this day and age, so to speak. I think that's a really important skill. So I'm going to listen to that one. I think it is really useful with all the shenanigans happening in our world. Thanks for sharing that. I don't have anything on my list. I've been reading some boring stuff this week, so I didn't really share anything. So I wanted to definitely highlight what you're reading. All right, well that was a quick one. We skipped the banter. We went straight to what are you reading. We're on to sponsors, man, efficiency. So let's talk about one of our favorite sponsors here, before we move on. Who we got?

Allissa Haines:

We have Jojoba this episode, is indeed sponsored by The Original Jojoba Company. You know how I feel about us using the highest quality products. And I'm going to go off script here and say that my clients, it's been super hot and humid here, in the Massachusetts area for the last week or so. And thankfully we've gotten a lot of rain, but that means it's been crazy humid and weird and sticky. And my clients have been mentioning how happy they are to not feel slimy when they leave my massage office. Of all of the products I use and especially The Original Jojoba Company, Jojoba. It doesn't leave that film on the skin that feels like the product is suffocating your skin. So I can give a massage and the client can leave my office and they don't feel all heavy and slick and thick.

So that is nice. It is also non-allergenic so you can use it on any client and every client, without being concerned about an allergic reaction, which is a big deal. You can get 20% off the price of Jojoba when you shop through our link, massagebusinessblueprint.com/jojoba. And also, I've said it before, I'll say it again, get on their email list because they have had lots of free shipping offers here and there and some discounts on gallons. So it is worth it to visit massagebusinessblueprint.com/jojoba. Check out the product, get on their email list, buy yourself a gallon. You're going to love it.

Michael Reynolds:

I love the phrase, heavy and slick and thick.

Allissa Haines:

No, you know what though? I've learned so much about the ingredients of massage products lately, and some of the stuff that the cheaper brands are putting in products is just horrifying.

Michael Reynolds:

Oh, I'm sure it is. I don't even want to know.

Allissa Haines:

Yeah. And the way that it interacts with your skin and literally suffocates, it's just terrible. So I'm just going to tell you, if you're paying $10 for a half gallon or gallon of a massage product, there's a reason for that. So yeah, there you go.

Michael Reynolds:

So get yourself some Jojoba.

Allissa Haines:

I'm excited. Right, get yourself some Jojoba, but I'm pretty excited because today Michael is handling our topic, and very specifically a topic that was asked about by one of our premium members in the community. It's something we had talked about briefly at some point and we decided it needed its own thing. So Michael, what do you got?

Michael Reynolds:

All right, let's do its own thing here. So we're going to talk about what to do when moving to a new website. This was, as Alissa mentioned, one of our Blueprint Mastermind members asked this question and she thought we talked about it before and we may have, but apparently we both forgot and couldn't find it. So either it wasn't talked about, or it was talked about briefly enough that it didn't make a huge impression. So we're going to unpack it a little bit more here. So this has come up recently, because we're talking to quite a few members that are moving to a new website. We actually build websites also, through Massage Business Blueprint for our Blueprint Mastermind members. So side note, if you're looking for a new website that's affordable, done fast and relatively painlessly by people who know massage. We do that as well too here.

So feel free to check out our website for more details on that or just reach out. So we've been building some, seeing the process of going from an old website to a new one. We've seen this over and over. Whether you're working with us or working with someone else or doing it yourself. There's a checklist of things that I think is fairly useful to go through, to make sure that you have a smooth transition. You don't lose any data in the process, your new website functions as well or better than the old one and you keep all your ducks in a row, so to speak. So this is the checklist. I'm going to warn you. It's a bit technical. So listen to this with the perspective of, Hey, if you don't know what I'm talking about or feel like it's completely overwhelming, that's a good opportunity to talk to whoever's helping with your website.

So talk to your web developer, talk to whoever's handling it, possibly talk to your web host. If you're DIYing it. Whoever helps you support your website, you might just bring some of these things to them or whoever's redesigning it for you. So there's also lots of links. So in the show notes, we're going to have the links available. So don't try to remember all this stuff, just go to the show notes. This is episode 424, and the links to these tools I referenced will be there as well. All right. So this is broken up into before launch, and after launch. So this is before you launch your new website, stuff to get ready. And then after launch, stuff that you want to check after it's live on the new site. So let's assume your website is pretty much done.

You're thinking, okay, great. Either I did it myself or my developer put it together or someone helped me put it together. I think I'm ready to go. Here is the stuff you want to make sure you do before you push that magic launch button, whatever form that takes for you. So first, you want to make sure that you've created, what's called 301 redirects, from old URLs to new URLs. Now maybe I sound like I just spoke in spaghetti code. So when you have a website and you have pages on the site, there's an address where that page lives. It might be yourdomain.com/about, or yourdomain.com/services. So on the new site, sometimes they will match, but sometimes they won't. If you have a new site built, sometimes those addresses can change. For example, on the old site, it might be /about, on the new site it might be /aboutme or aboutus or something like that, or services might be massage-services. So that means if search engines have indexed the old pages, which they have, or links are going to it, or people are bookmarking or whatever, the old links will not work.

So what you want to do is, create what's called redirects. So on the new site, you set up a system, and it's different for every platform, but it's often a little visual thing where you can plug them in or maybe your developer will do it for you. And you basically tell your new website, hey, if someone comes along and requests /about, forward it to aboutus, and that way they'll kind of redirect and find the new page. It's especially important for search engines, because if Google's indexing the old page and then it rein indexes it next time around and finds it's broken, that can damage your search ranking.

So you want to tell Google, "Hey, the new page is over here in this new address, go get it there." And Google will find it and all is good. So they're called 301. 301 is the code for the redirects, basically just redirect is the main word you want to know. So if you're doing on a DIY platform, like a Squarespace, Wix or Weebly or something, look for a redirect in the interface or email support, ask them how to create a redirect on the site. Or again, talk to your web developer if it's on a different system. Next, this is not mission critical, but it's a nice touch. Create a custom error page. An error page is when someone does come upon your site and they're hitting a link that is broken or a page doesn't exist or something. Sometimes that will still happen.

Often, if there's not a customized error page, it'll just be some generic, 404 error or some non-user friendly, scary message. So most systems will let you create a custom error page where it's still got your logo at the top. It looks like a regular page in your site and it'll have a message saying, "Oh, this page doesn't exist. Maybe it moved here. Here's a search box to search and find it", or give someone more user friendly instructions. One example is, if you go to massagebusinessblueprint.com and go to a page that doesn't exist, like go to /xyz or something that doesn't really exist. You get a picture of an ice cream cone that's fallen down the sidewalk, just to be fun. And it says, "Oh, this page isn't here. Use our search box to find what you're looking for." And it gives people something to do. So that's a useful step to take when you're moving to a new site, because some pages probably will not exist on the new site. And maybe you forgot some redirects or there's no reason for a redirect and that's okay.

Allissa Haines:

I'm partial to using a picture of a sad kitten or a sad puppy.

Michael Reynolds:

There you go, also works.

Allissa Haines:

Side note. Carry on.

Michael Reynolds:

There's never a point where, or never a situation where kittens or puppies are not appropriate. So next, make sure your favicon is installed. Again, not mission critical. A favicon is a little icon that shows up in the browser bar when someone hits your site. Often it gets forgotten when you're moving to a new site. So make sure you've got a little icon of your logo up there. Again, your web developer can help you or your DIY platform probably has a place to put it in there. So, email support. Next, check all your page titles for user experience and Google experience, including your homepage. It's one of those things that gets forgotten a lot of times when you're moving to a new site. You're building something new and you end up with these default page titles. And then for example, the homepage might just say homepage, with nothing else. Make sure your homepage has your massage practice business name there.

And then, your location after it. I harp on this all the time with websites. Make sure your internal pages have things like your massage business, and then a pipe symbol or a dash. And then, about us. And then, the services page says, "Massage services", is very descriptive so that when someone's searching and finds your site on Google or it's shared on social media, it says your business name and then what the page is about, on that page. So make sure those are clean and well formatted. Next, move code snippets to the new site. This gets forgotten a lot too. So let's say, on your old site, you've got Google analytics installed. You've got Facebook tracking pixel installed. You've got maybe MailChimp or MailerLite code installed for, maybe an overlay popup box or something. You've got Google Tag Manager installed, all that stuff's in your old site.

It's easy to forget to move it to the new site. And you're like, "Wait, why aren't my analytics working", or, "Why isn't my Facebook pixel working", or, "Why isn't my MailChimp popup working?" Because you didn't move the code over. So make sure that you take all that code from those other apps and move it to your new site. Now, we did a webinar about this a while back, maybe a few months ago on Google analytics. And we talked about Google Tag Manager. So Google Tag Manager is a really easy way to make this a one step thing. So Google Tag Manager is a tool that lets you put other code inside of it, like a bucket. And then, all you have to do is move that bucket to your new site. The bucket is a chunk of code, but that chunk of code contains all the other code.

So basically, your Google analytics code can go inside of Google Tag Manager, your Facebook pixels can go there, your MailChimp code, everything that you add onto your website can go inside that tag manager tag. And then all you have to do, is just move that tag manager code from the old site to the new site, everything follows it. So that's a good way to keep it really efficient. So again, if this is super confusing, just be aware, you've got code in your old site, possibly that needs to move, talk to whoever supports your site and make sure they do all that.

I like this one a lot. I like to make sure I always make a backup of my current site before it goes away. So before you launch your new site, you want to make a backup of your existing website so that you can always find stuff that maybe got forgotten or left behind, or you want to reference. At some point we made a backup. We switched websites maybe a couple of years ago, I think, for Massage Business Blueprint. And I took a backup of our old site, because we may want to go back and find content on that site that maybe we didn't move over, but we need it for some reason. It's just nice to have it. So you can basically take a snapshot of your site and download it to your computer and keep it forever. There's two apps. There's actually a bunch of apps that do this.

I'm a Mac user. I use one called SiteSucker. It's a $5 app you buy one time, it's super low cost, and they have a trial version. So you can just do the trial. And I'm pretty sure you can just download it one time for your two week trial or whatever, and never pay anything for it and get your site snapshot one time. So it's called SiteSucker. There's a link in the show notes to that. I've heard that WebCopy is a good one for Windows, it does something similar. Again, a link in the show notes will be there for that one as well. So those apps let you just download your entire website to your computer. And that way you can open it up on your computer and browse around locally, without it being online and you can get access to all that old stuff you might need. You might not, but it's good to have. Finally, before launch, download and take a screenshot of your current domain records.

So a quick, super short primer on how domains work. So your domain is the thing that's like, yourbusinessname.com, lotu massage.com. That's your domain. That's what is the address for your website. The way domains work is, when someone types in that address to their browser, like lotusmassage.com, the domain is pointing to these things called name servers or DNS servers. These servers over here tell the world basically where the domain actually points. It has different little records and a different little entries that say, "Okay, this domain is actually pointing to this address on the internet." And then it sends the person to that correct address, wherever your site is hosted. So it's not that your domain just goes directly to the site. Domain has this intermediate step of going to these other servers over here. Those servers contain all these different records.

These records define, again, where your website is pointed. They define how your email is handled. If your email is handled through Google Workspace or Microsoft Outlook 365 or some other service. They handle how your domain is routed... Or I'm sorry, your email is routed. They handle sub domains and things like that. So it's an important thing to have, and often they can get messed up inadvertently when you move them. So I always like to open up my domain records and take a screenshot of everything, and then also download them all. So I have a couple different ways of getting access to them if I had to do a revert. If you want to launch your site and say, "Oh crap, something went wrong." You can change your domain records back to what they were before, if you know what they were. You can revert and then fix whatever happened.

So a screenshot's pretty easy. You basically open up, let's say your domain is with Google Domains or GoDaddy, or register.com. Assuming it's using the name servers built into your domain registrar, you just open it up, look for DNS records, take a screenshot. There's also a tool I use to download them. It's called dnschecker.org. And there's a direct link to the domain tool. You basically plug in your domain. It'll give you a whole snapshot of all the records. You can click download as a text file, and you can download it to your computer. Again, this may be super confusing and like, "Ah, what the heck is he talking about?" Just either do these steps yourself and keep it in case you need to work with your web developer, or ask your developer to do this for you, say, "Hey, can you please take a snapshot of my domain records before we launch the site? I want to make sure we preserve what it used to be in case we need to go back to it."

All right, next is after launch. This is after launch stuff. When you're moving to your new website and getting it launched. So your new website is online. The domain's pointing to the new version. You're all good to go. First thing I do is test my forms to make sure I get notified by email. This is a big thing that often gets forgotten or doesn't really get tested. And then you find yourself three months later, people have tried to contact you through your form on your website and you're not getting any of it. So go to your website, fill out all forms on your site, like the contact form for example, make sure you get an email notification. Also, try to subscribe to your newsletter, make sure that goes into your email list property... Proper rather. Test all those forms. Make sure they work. Next, check for broken links.

It's easy to have broken links when you move to a new site. Things just maybe get forgotten or not moved properly. There's a tool from a service called Ahrefs that has a broken link checker. You can basically plug in your domain. It'll crawl the site. It'll look for broken links, give you a report. It's good to do every now and then anyway. I found five broken links on one of my websites. I'm like, "Oh crap. That's not working." And these are external links as well. So for example, if you reference external resources, it'll tell you if those other external links aren't, they don't exist anymore and you can update the link going out to them. So if you're referencing medical studies or an article on ABMP's website or something, if that link changes, this tool will tell you if that link is broken.

So you can go find the new address and fix it. Also, with internal links too, on your own site. You want to update Search Console to connect to the new site and update and submit it to the new index. So Search Console is Google's tool that gives you insight into what people are searching for when they find your site. It also lets you control how often Google crawls your site. So Search Console is a good tool to link up to your site, make sure you move the link to your new site. And then, there's a little section there that says, "Hey, submit to index or re-crawl my site." Go ahead and do that so that your site will be indexed faster and the new site will be updated in Google faster.

I would also test your site speed. It's a new site, it hasn't been tested yet, really. So test the speed and make sure there's no huge images bogging it down or things that you need to address to make sure the speed is fast enough. GTmetrics is a good tool for that. Again, link is in the show notes, it's free, plug your site into GTmetrics. You'll get a score. If it's a C or a D or something, send the report to your developer and say, "Hey, my new site is slow. Is there an image that needs to be optimized or compressed or what can be done?" And they should able to fix that. Or maybe you can compress the image if you're DIYing it. Check the Meta information on all your pages. Every page has information coded into it that determines what gets displayed when Google indexes it and you're sharing on Facebook, for example, or other social properties.

Things like the description, things like the featured image. So a good way to test this is the Facebook Debugger tool. Again, link in show notes. The theme here is, link in show notes, but if you put in your website address into that tool, it'll give you a little report down there. It says, "Okay. Here's the featured image that will show up. Here's the title, here's the description." You want to make sure all that looks good. So if you find that the image is not displaying or the title looks weird, or there's no description underneath, you want to go into your website platform and make sure that you've put in a featured image, a good title for that page, a good description, like a one sentence summary of what that page is about. And that's really important for the visual aspect of when people see your site shared on social media or in Google search results.

All right, we're almost done. Check your SSL, make sure your SSL is operating properly. SSL stands for Secure Socket Layers. Every site in the world these days should be on SSL. It should be secured with this particular feature. So what that means is, any kind of data going to and from your website is encrypted. So when you look at your website, the way you can see if this is properly set up is, you should see a little lock icon in your browser bar. It should be closed.

And if you click on the lock icon, you shouldn't see any errors or anything. If you click on it, for example, in Chrome, I'm clicking on the lock icon here. It says connection is secure. There's no messages or warnings popping up. It all looks good. So if you click on the lock icon and you see any kind of warnings or errors or messages, or the lock icon is open, especially, there may be an issue. So talk to whoever helps you or talk to your support or do something to make sure that your SSL certificate is installed properly and your site is secured. It's not only a security thing. It's also a speed... Or not a speed, but a search engine ranking factor as well. So you want to make sure that's in place.

Almost finally, I would review accessibility as well, for ADA compliance. So there is a free tool I use for this, also in the show notes, there's our theme. It's free. You just make a free account and you can run your site through this accessibility tool. And it will go through and tell you if maybe you've got some images missing, alt tags. So the people with visual impairments can read those. Maybe you have some forms that aren't properly executing with certain types of screen readers. Maybe you've got some contrast issues. Maybe there's some text that's too hard to read on certain pages.

It'll go through and it'll give you some warnings if there are accessibility issues. So again, these are for people of varying abilities, people with perhaps visual impairments, audio, cognitive, all sorts of different levels of abilities. You want to be sure those individuals can access your website and use it properly. So when you move to a new site, again, it's a new site, hasn't really been tested as much. It's a good test to run. It's a good test to run every so often anyway, every few months, every year, at least.

All right, there's the list. I would wait one week before you cancel your old hosting plan, your old website service. Some people cancel it too soon. Some people forget and pay fees they don't need to pay for six months. So be sure you do cancel your old service, but I would wait one week. Make sure everything works properly. Make sure you've tested everything. Just give yourself a week to revert back if you need to, as a safety net. So give it a week, put a note in your calendar. After a week, things are looking good. You feel comfortable, you've made a backup of your site already. Then contact your old platform, whatever that may be and cancel your old service if necessary. So that is my list of stuff to worry about when you're moving to a new website. Have I completely gotten in the weeds and confused everyone? Has this been useful? What do you think, Alissa?

Allissa Haines:

I think that, for anyone not about to change their website, this probably was tedious and boring and they've already stopped listening.

Michael Reynolds:

Probably.

Allissa Haines:

What I think also is that, this is going to be the best resource when people ask us about switching websites, in switching platforms and stuff. So I'm so excited to have this to refer to. So I think this is one of those weird, evergreen resources that you don't care about it until you need it. And then you're really grateful that Michael and Alissa made it.

Michael Reynolds:

That's fair.

Allissa Haines:

And actually this was really good too, because a lot of the stuff, like you mentioned, could and should be done semi-regularly on a current website, even if you're not changing platforms. And I have made some to-dos for me to work on some speed and some other, the broken link thing. Oh my gosh. Yeah. I got to run that on a few websites. So this was really tedious and lovely at the same time.

Michael Reynolds:

Thanks. Well, I think a lot of it is, I want to make sure people feel empowered, because often we're running our massage practices. We don't do this stuff every day. Maybe we work with someone to build a new site and we feel like we're in the dark like, "Oh, they're doing some weird, magical thing over here I don't understand." And I want to make sure that people know what to ask. If you don't know what any of this stuff means, at least you know to ask whoever's helping you, "Hey, did you create a custom error page? Did you do 301 redirects for search? Did you get a favicon installed? Could you make a backup for me of my site? Or tell me how to do that or help me with that. Did you move my Google analytics code over?" The stuff you could ask just to make sure you are being taken care of. I think that's important.

Allissa Haines:

Absolutely.

Michael Reynolds:

All right. Well, there we go. So with that, good time to move on to our next sponsor, get us out of the weeds and onto something else.

Allissa Haines:

And ABMP has been a longtime supporter and sponsor of our podcast. Thank you. Let's talk about the ABMP apps, because I found myself using them again this week in my own practice. There are two. ABMP has the Five-Minute Muscle app and the Pocket Pathology app. Pardon me. You can learn about both of them at abmp.com/apps. They are quick reference apps designed to help you find the information that you might need to make a decision for session planning in the moment, even, or to just use outside of a session to refresh your muscle and pathology knowledge. The Five-Minute Muscle app includes muscle specific techniques and palpation videos for the 83 muscles most often addressed by professional massage therapists. They use progressive web app technology to take up less space on your phone or device. And these apps are included with ABMP membership. You can go to abmp.com/apps to try sample demos and see if this could be right for you. Thanks A...A... Oh, wow. That was just blah words, hard. Abmp.com/apps. Thank you very much for being a sponsor. And folks I'm telling you, really, check out the demos. They're pretty awesome.

Michael Reynolds:

Indeed. Hey, speaking of apps, I found an app for our quick tip today.

Allissa Haines:

I have nothing for our quick tip today. So you go right ahead.

Michael Reynolds:

All right. I found this app called Profile Pick Maker, and it's super simple. It's a web app. You just basically upload a photo, but what it does is, it lets you upload your headshot profile picture and it gives you tons of options for cool backgrounds. It's really simple and fairly useless, but it's kind of fun. So it's at pfpmaker.com, and link in show notes again. And it works. I can't tell if it works really well, if you don't have a white background, but my profile picture did have a nice clean white background and it let me choose all sorts of different options. You could look like you're in an office or on the beach or in the forest, or have a nice little abstract grid pattern behind you.

I updated my Twitter and LinkedIn profiles with the new photo, just to see how I liked it. And you can match your brand color. So for example, if your logo is hex color, blah, blah, blah, you can match that color in the abstract background for your photo and have some branding going on. There was a lot of options. It's a really cool, fun little tool. So if you want to spice up your photo of your profile picture, then it's a neat tool. So I found it and wanted to share it.

Allissa Haines:

And I just went to your Twitter profile to look at your new picture, and it's perfect for you. What I will say. That's what I will say.

Michael Reynolds:

I know what that means. I can be [inaudible].

Allissa Haines:

[inaudible] People to look at it [inaudible]Yeah, we'll put it in our Instagram. I came up with a quick tip actually, while you were talking about it, because it is a phrase we have uttered a bunch of times in my household on the last few days, and also in my work. I'm a big fan of saying no to things. You all know that I don't like to be overextended. I'm tired. I have a lot of balls in the air like many of you and I have learned over the past few years to really focus on priorities and say no to things that I just don't want to get dragged into. At the same time, I was approached with a potential new project with someone I adore and we have worked on it together and it's massage related. You're going to see it happening soon. And I have had a blast with it.

I had a blast working with my friend, Ruth. I had a blast creating this resource. I'm excited today to work on the final stage of the design. And it's because I said yes to something that I was like, "Man, it's going to be more work." And then I was like, "Meh, it could be fun. Ah, this is going to be really useful." And by 10 seconds in, I was just so excited about it. So there's that. And then also, in my home and our personal life, we are thinking of expanding the family to include a pet. And this is something we have been very not on board with for a long time, but now are like, "Okay, this might be the right time for our family." So we've talked about it a bunch and we've started to look into it and actually complete some applications. And at every step of the process, when we have been like, "Uh, are we sure?"

And I think it's good that we're really weighing this really conscientiously and thinking above all the downsides. And every time we get to that point, I think, choose the bigger life. Sometimes I have to defy my instinct for simplicity and vacancy and choose the bigger life, because that can include a lot more joy. So that my friends, choose the bigger life. Sometimes that is a good option. And that is a phrase directly stolen from the podcast you all know I really like, the Happier Podcast with Gretchen Rubin. And there you go, choose the bigger life.

Michael Reynolds:

I love that. I also love how my quick tip is this silly app and yours was this micro keynote speech of inspiration. So I like that spectrum we covered in quick tips today.

Allissa Haines:

Well, I forget there was something that you said in your thing that made me think of it though. I don't know what it was, but there we go. It's all related. It's all one. It's all one [inaudible].

Michael Reynolds:

The circle of life. All right, well with that, let's wrap it up.

Allissa Haines:

Let's be done.

Michael Reynolds:

Let's just be done. All right, everyone. Hey, we're glad you were here. You can find us on the web at massagebusinessblueprint.com. If you're not a member of our Blueprint Mastermind community, check it out there. You can try free for 30 days and it's a fantastic community. People are joining all the time. We get a handful of new members every week and they're joining and getting great value right off the bat from it and meeting a ton of new people who can help them, including Alissa and I, of course, but also peer mentoring is huge. So check it out. Also, if you want to email us, the address is podcast@massagebusinessblueprint.com. That goes to both Alissa and me and we will respond. Send us feedback, criticism, love notes, hate mail, whatever you want. We'll take it all. And again, thanks for joining us today. We appreciate you being a listener. We'll see you next time. Have a great day.

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