Podcast

Episode 422

Jul 8, 2022

How do you show your personality and life in your business marketing while keeping professional boundaries? Allissa and Michael give you their thoughts.

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EPISODE 422

Weekly Roundup

Discussion Topic

  • Balancing the Personal and the Professional in your Marketing

Quick Tips

  • Have both a business AND a personal emergency fund

Sponsors


Transcript: 

Sponsor message:

This episode is sponsored by ABMP. Let's talk about the ABMP Massage and Body Work magazine today. This is an award-winning magazine included in print for ABMP members and available for free for everyone at massageandbodyworkdigital.com. We write the Blueprint for Success column in every issue. There are a bunch of fantastic and helpful columns in every issue. It is a professional journal. You can trust that includes techniques, in-depth features, video tie-ins to cover the issues that matter most to us, massage therapists and body workers. Again, you can learn more and read all of the issues online for free at massageandbodyworkdigital.com.

Michael Reynolds:

Hey, everyone. Welcome to the Massage Business Blueprint podcast, where we help you attract more clients, make more money, and along the way improve your quality of life. I'm Michael Reynolds.

Allissa Haines:

I'm Allissa Haines.

Michael Reynolds:

We're your hosts. Welcome to our show today. We are glad you're here. Allissa, I see you're on your treadmill desk bopping along there.

Allissa Haines:

I am. I'm walking at half a mile an hour on my treadmill desk-

Michael Reynolds:

That's respectable.

Allissa Haines:

... which I totally love. When I sit at a desk, my shoulder hurts, and when I just stand at a standing desk, my knees and my hips hurt, but this slow roll, it's just... It's doing the job.

Michael Reynolds:

Looks comfy.

Allissa Haines:

It's really doing the job.

Michael Reynolds:

Yeah, looks comfy. All right. I purposely did not put anything in what are you reading this week because I'm intrigued by yours. I want to hear more about what you've got going on here.

Allissa Haines:

Yeah. So our friend Alexander, who is, I think, in Iowa, he sent me this wonderful link the other... He has started working for the VA, the Veterans Administration whatever hospital, something, something. I should have maybe looked into that a little more specifically. But he has actually started working for the VA and it was a lot of paperwork to get approved by them, and then he's actually working in the facility, I believe. And I talked to him a little bit throughout this process. And then he sent me the other day a link for all the VAs that are looking for massage therapists, full time, some of them. And as I'm looking through different... So it says full time. I don't know what that means, and there's different areas of the country that are looking for them at different VAs. There's Oklahoma and Washington and Michigan and California and a bunch of others, but we have the link in our show notes. It's on usajobs.gov. He's really enjoying his experience with the VA. I know a handful of therapists who have worked for different VAs, either in a facility or through a partnership. They've worked at their own office, but the VA has funneled them clients. So I think that it could be a really neat opportunity. So if that's something you're interested in, you can find the link in our show notes, and yeah, check it out. I was think-

Michael Reynolds:

Alexander's actually joining us today on Facebook. He's popped into to confirm it is Iowa.

Allissa Haines:

Oh, there he is right now. Yay. You know what? I didn't put this in the show notes, but I wanted to talk about something else that I'm reading slash seeing. Is that okay?

Michael Reynolds:

Of course.

Allissa Haines:

Okay. My camera's doing that weird thing again where it gets all fuzzy.

Michael Reynolds:

Yeah, you're blurring in and out.

Allissa Haines:

I'm sorry. I'm sorry. So here's the thing, people. I was not on the show last week. You may have seen Meg Donnelly, who was amazing on the show. She was just the best cohost ever. I feel like I should just quit my job here. But she was on the show because I was in New York City, the Big Apple, to see my friend James in a play on Broadway. And it is called A Strange Loop. And if you're have been at all paying attention to mainstream media and such, you would actually probably have seen something about this, because they've been on Fallon and I think The Tonight Show, and I think they were even, like, Jimmy Kimmel. I don't know which one's which. And then they were on the CBS Sunday Morning show, the cast of this show. James is a friend of mine from college and he's a fellow massage therapist. It was one of his side gigs as he was working towards being a rock star, superstar, Broadway star, Tony-Award-winning play.

Allissa Haines:

So anyhow, it's called A Strange Loop and it is a cast of seven. There is the main character who is a guy named Usher, who is in fact an usher at a theater, and his character is in fact writing a musical and it is called, what is it called... A Big Gay Queer-Ass Broadway Musical Show. It is all Black and queer characters and actors, and they had 11 Tony nominations. Anyhow, if you have any opportunity to be near New York City, you should absolutely go see this play. Strange Loop Musical is the website. And they had a mask policy when I was there last week. They have since dropped their mask policy. So I am so glad it was in place, otherwise I would not have gone.

Allissa Haines:

But I have not been to live theater, never mind because of the pandemic. I just haven't been to live theater in, I don't know, 10 years? And then I hadn't been to New York City to see anything in years and years and years. I think since the last time when James and I were in college and our theater group would go to New York City on occasion because I went to college in Western Massachusetts. I was like, "I think that was the last time I saw a Broadway show, James," and now I'm seeing him in one.

Allissa Haines:

But it's really cool. Even if you just follow the Strange Loop Instagram, it's really fun, because every morning they post pictures from the night before of all the famous people that went to see the show. And they've got producers like RuPaul and Mindy Kaling and just phenomenal producers. They won Tonys. I have gushed for way longer than I intended, but it was probably the best live show I've ever seen, and I don't take that lightly. I've seen a lot of really good shows, and yeah. That's what I have to tell you.

Michael Reynolds:

Hey, I'm sold. I'm convinced. There you go.

Allissa Haines:

And it was great, because on the train ride home I got to listen in to the episode with Meg live while you guys were airing. And that was really weird to be a listener to my own podcast on the week I wasn't in it. So it was great. It was a really good episode. That is what I have to say.

Michael Reynolds:

Speaking of great, before we move on, we have a friend from across the pond saying hi from London. Vanita is saying hi from the UK. Thanks, Vanita. Glad you're here.

Allissa Haines:

Oh, hey, Vanita.

Michael Reynolds:

Welcome. Welcome.

Allissa Haines:

Come on in. Good afternoon. It's good afternoon for you.

Michael Reynolds:

Good day, wherever-

Allissa Haines:

Good day.

Michael Reynolds:

... and whenever you may be. All right. So before we move on, tell us about Happyface, Allissa.

Allissa Haines:

I will tell you about Happyface as soon as my little screen flips over. Lagged there for a second. Face cradles, my friends. They're the bane of our existence, right? They can be super uncomfortable for a client, and then the client shifts around a million times during your massage. And then you stress out that they're not getting a good massage. Well, my friend, Happyface is the most comfy face cradle so you can give the most relaxing massage of your client's life. Innovative heart-shaped design. It's really cool though. The little heart-shaped point, you just put it right on like where your third eye would be and then, magically, no sinus pressure, no eye pressure, no need to adjust mid-massage, no wrinkles or makeup smearing. You're not going to smash those expensive fake lashes that clients come in with, which are just gorgeous. Made in the USA. Happyface is seamless with an easy-to-clean surface, and it's about the same dimensions as all the other massage face cradles so it's totally going to fit on your frame. It's totally going to fit your face cradle covers. It's got a full Velcro back so it stays where you put it. You can get 20% off your entire purchase massagebusinessblueprint.com/happyface. Use code MASSAGEBB at checkout, but that's going to be right there. You're going to see that when you go to massagebusinessblueprint.com/happyface,

Michael Reynolds:

It is comfortable. I can vouch for it. My massage therapist has a Happyface cradle and it is very comfy, so I am a satisfied customer as well.

Michael Reynolds:

Before we move on, just a quick note. I'd like to mention this. We do broadcast this live, so you may hear us mentioning people popping in comments and questions. It occurred to me that it may be helpful to tell people how to find us live. We always just, hey, find us on Facebook and Twitter and YouTube. But if you want to know how to actually find us on those places, maybe you're not too familiar, go to our website first, which is massagebusinessblueprint.com, and at the top, you'll see little icons for social media properties, like you'll see a Facebook icon, a YouTube icon, et cetera. If you click on that, that will go directly to our Facebook page or whatever one you're clicking on.

Michael Reynolds:

So if you have trouble finding us, we do broadcast every Wednesday at 9:00 AM Eastern. The live episode is via video and you can follow along and post comments and questions. Go to our website, massagebusinessblueprint.com, go to the top, click on the icon where you want to follow us, and usually it's going to be Facebook, but we are also on YouTube and Twitter. So if you click, that'll go directly to our page and that's an easy way to find us. So I thought I'd mention that.

Michael Reynolds:

All right. So let's move on. Balancing the personal and professional in your marketing.

Allissa Haines:

Yeah. This comes up on occasion when people email or members chat about boundaries, the biggest thing we have to deal with in our massage businesses. But I want to give a few... kind of a once over and then a few examples about how to determine what you share and what you don't share.

Allissa Haines:

So it can be a really tricky balance when you're running a one-person show, right? Because you are your business. Your personality is going to directly and dominantly feature in your branding and vice versa. So it can be a little tricky to figure out like where your business ends and begins and where you and your personality and your life and your private life ends and begins. And if we think about that in terms of what you share with clients and what you don't, it can be a little easier to work through the different factors so that you can feel comfortable with what you share about you as a human that can help your business grow and also help you connect genuinely with your clients, and also what you keep private so that you still have privacy so that you still feel like you are a human separate from your business and you don't feel too sucked in or violated if you share too much accidentally.

Allissa Haines:

And I'm talking not just about what we share online, like that default to social media nowadays, but what you talk about in person with clients. The bits of your personal life that you choose to share in conversation with clients is probably even more powerful and relevant than what you share online. So please know that we're talking about the broad scope of how you communicate with clients and what you choose to share about yourself or not.

Allissa Haines:

You are your business. Our one-person massage shops, we are the totality of our business. But that does not mean that all of us should be entirely present in our business. Not every part of me is present in my business. So what I mean in that is that I might share that I frequent the coffee shop across the street from my office. I might share that I am part of a book club through my local library. But people do not need to know... I'm trying to think about something private that I might do for just myself. They might not need to know that I go to a knitting group two towns over because I purposely don't want anyone to know me there, or that I choose to go to CrossFit three towns over because I don't want any of my clients seeing how bad I... or how out of shape I'm going to be at the beginning of that. So we get to choose what we keep private, hopefully. I mean, we can't always choose, but we can try.

Allissa Haines:

So when you're thinking about what to share and what not to share and the parts of your life that you make available and known to clients or potential clients, what are we thinking about? We want to think about what is relevant to my practice. So local business connections, places that I spend my money as a consumer in the same area, region as my own business, that's relevant. I can share about that coffee shop. I can share about the yoga studio if I'm comfortable. I can absolutely share about the new Thai restaurant down the street. I may or may not want to share about the mental health therapist I see. Maybe I don't want a bunch of my clients going to my mental health therapist, and that's legit. So what's relevant? Places that I spend my money as a consumer when I'm trying to connect with people who are going to spend their money with me when they are a consumer. Certain life experiences that are directly related to my work.

Allissa Haines:

This could get a little tricky. We're going to... This is a landmine, but I am in physical therapy for some shoulder stuff. I am absolutely going to want to share with my clients how much I love this particular physical therapist, but, and we're going to get to this in a minute, I'm not going to share it with them right away, because I don't want clients to necessarily know that I'm in physical therapy, because I don't want them to not schedule an appointment because they're worried about me overworking and hurting my shoulder. But it is a life experience that's directly related.

Allissa Haines:

What is another life experience that could be directly related to my work? I only put one example in there and I am regretful of that now, because now I'm like, oh. I think when I was prepping this on the train last week, I was like, I'll think of something between now and then, and then I didn't. But if you have... Okay, so here's a good thing. If you have a kid, so like I live with a kid who's autistic, and they are in a program, a social group program that is really good for them, it encourages them to be themselves... And since I work with a lot of parents of kids with various disabilities and support needs, it is super relevant that I can talk to my ideal clients about this group that I go to. I'm sorry. Michael froze for a second, and I was worried that I also froze.

Michael Reynolds:

Still hear you.

Allissa Haines:

You still hear me?

Michael Reynolds:

We're good. Yep, we're good.

Allissa Haines:

Okay, good. So yeah, so it's really relevant to my clients and potential clients who are very often parents of kids with disabilities that I utilize this resource for my kid and it goes really well. If my kid was someone who really needed a lot of privacy, I would not share that. So what's relevant to my practice? What are the privacy thoughts around that?

Allissa Haines:

And that kind of jumps us right into your own comfort and exposure with privacy. If you have family and/or close friends who you do a lot of things with and they are very private people, you should not be posting a picture of your dinner and your friend on your business's social media, even if you went out and you want to share about that local restaurant. If your family or friend that you are with is someone who really wants privacy, you need to be respectful of that so keep that in mind. Your own comfort with exposure and privacy regarding where you are and are not located at any moment in time. I might go out to dinner, but I don't want to post at the beginning of my dinner, because if I got clients who are a little, little, little less hip with the boundaries, I don't want them showing up at the restaurant where I'm having dinner to say hi, or at the coffee shop. I want to post the next day or at least several hours later. So if you're someone who doesn't want to be intruded upon and you're concerned about boundaries of some of your clients or potential clients, posting after the fact, being respectful of the privacy of whoever you're with.

Allissa Haines:

Another factor to consider is your own lifestyle and how it could relate to your business. So my life involves a social group for kids with autism. That is relevant to my practice because I work with a lot of parents, kids with disabilities. But what if my lifestyle involved illegally racing cars? That is an activity that I probably should not... You know, when you're doing things that are illegal or if you're smoking lots of pot in a state where that is not yet legal or you're doing any kind of activity that might make clients and potential clients feel you are less trustworthy, that you have questionable judgment, you should probably not share those particular kinds of activities. That's just a good idea, and that's not rocket science. And yet, I see all the time massage therapists posting pics of smoking pot in a state where it's illegal, which, no judgment, I'm cool with that, but if you're doing that on your business/personal account, if those accounts are mixed, like my Instagram's kind of mixed, maybe not the best idea.

Allissa Haines:

You also, if your target demographic is, let's say, people with complicated health conditions who are very much involved in medicine and medical environments in the United States, you might not want to be posting super uber hippie, let's drink this mate and smoke this something or other and have some kind of spiritual trip. Not a thing that people with complicated health conditions who are under very close watch from a traditional medical environment want to see. You probably shouldn't be selling nutritional supplements and herbals to these same clients or selling them at all, because these are people who... You get what I'm saying. Oppositional. You don't want to be posting oppositional activities or ventures that are completely opposing what you would want your target and typical clientele to be attracted to. If you are in a small town with a heavy conservative presence and that clientele is working for you, probably don't want to be posting about the polyamory convention that you have gone to. There's various things that you should keep separate if the people you work with are very, very different from you. And I really commend people who can work on client bases that are very, very different from them, because sometimes it takes a lot of patience and biting your own tongue and I respect that in a lot of ways.

Allissa Haines:

Okay. Finally, don't be sharing or telling clients things that would make them feel bad for taking up your time or making you work. You don't want to be doing anything that would elicit sympathy from a client because you've really introduced a weird dynamic where they want to come to you and pay you for your service, but they don't want you to have to work too much. So things, examples. Physical pain that you are choosing to work through, like my shoulder. Clients have known that I had to take a couple weeks off to deal with some acute shoulder stuff, and so they might ask, "How's your shoulder?" I'm not going to tell them that I could barely sleep last night because I kept rolling onto it. What I'm going to say is, "Yeah, I'm in physical therapy and it's doing much better." There you go. You can choose what you tell people, and you don't want to complain about physical things or share about physical things that's going to make somebody feel bad about making you work.

Allissa Haines:

Also, especially when it's in the acute situation, tragedy and emotional stuff close to you. If a client asks how you are, you do not want to verbally throw up on them all of the bad things that have happened to you in the past week, because then they're just going to be on the table wanting to give you a hug and feeling bad for you. And I have made this error a couple of times at weird points in my life with clients who usually I had dual relationships with. But still, I realized when it was coming out of my mouth, it was a bad idea. We are all going to make this mistake.

Allissa Haines:

It is also, I want to remind you, okay to cancel a client if you're having a difficult emotional time. I had a situation years and years back where I got dumped over email five minutes before a client walked in the door. And when they walked in the door, I was okay, but... although I think that I must not have looked okay, because they were like, "Hey, you alright this morning?" And I was like, "Yeah, I'm fine." And... Trying to fix my fuzzy camera, sorry. And then two minutes into the massage, I just... Let's just say I wept silently through the bulk of that massage. And thank goodness, it was a very cool client who never opened his eyes and really didn't notice until... He told me later that he really didn't notice.

Allissa Haines:

But after the massage he came out and he was like, "You doing all right? You're a little off today." And I just started to sob and I was like, "You got to go. I'll see you next week." And we laughed about it later and I'm very lucky, but I really should have, when that client walked in the door, been like, "Nope, I just had a sad thing happen and I cannot work on you right now." So know that it's okay to cancel when things happen and you're worried that you're not going to be able to hold your crap together. Okay, yeah. You don't want to tell them anything that's going to make them feel bad for you through what should be their self-care time.

Allissa Haines:

I mentioned it already, but later posting, posting things after the fact that, one, you don't want to get stalked, and also you don't want someone to feel bad for you. They don't need to know that you just attended a funeral. They don't need to know that you had PT that morning. But weeks and months later, if you had a wonderful experience with a funeral home planning whatever's funeral, it's okay to share that in a business referral kind of way. Ditto that for PT, after the situation is resolved and you're feeling way, way better. So those are all my criteria. Sorry, I got a little long-winded in there. It's an interesting topic that fascinates me and I tend to go off on rants. But Michael, what do you have to say?

Michael Reynolds:

Yeah. I just think we're all constantly navigating this and learning to navigate it. So I know we've talked about it before, but it bears repeating because I think we're never going to stop having challenges with navigating this topic of the personal/professional boundary. So thanks for sharing these thoughts. Good stuff. I am going to go to our comments. We have a few more comments coming in from Facebook. Jose from Puerto Rico says hello. Thanks, Jose. Glad you're here.

Allissa Haines:

Hey, Jose.

Michael Reynolds:

And Marcy shared a good morning also from Facebook. Hey, Marcy. Glad you're joining us today. And-

Allissa Haines:

You know, we got an email this morning from a listener in France, too. I'm feeling good about our international presence right now.

Michael Reynolds:

This is international day. I'm calling it. And then Jen says hello from Facebook as well, or says good morning. So thanks, Jen. Glad you're here.

Allissa Haines:

Jen's from Illinois, but we'll call it international.

Michael Reynolds:

Close enough. Yeah. I mean, Illinois's my neighbor, so...

Allissa Haines:

That's right.

Michael Reynolds:

We're practically neighbors. I'm Indiana. All right, well-

Allissa Haines:

And let's just take a moment to appreciate that we love our members and listeners so much that a lot of them, we know where they are. I knew Alexander was in Iowa. I know Jen. Alexander and... I'm sorry, I just gesticulated and my treadmill unplugged itself.

Michael Reynolds:

Your technology is just falling apart today, isn't it?

Allissa Haines:

I am... This is indicative of pretty much how I have struggled with every task I have tried to accomplish in the last three weeks.

Michael Reynolds:

Let's see. Your internet is flaky. Your camera is fuzzy. Your treadmill desk is-

Allissa Haines:

Treadmill-

Michael Reynolds:

... dying.

Allissa Haines:

And I couldn't get out here early enough to move the treadmill and actually sit in my chair. I will not do this again. I will make sure that I have the treadmill out of the way moving forward for recording times.

Allissa Haines:

Well, let's just take this moment. I am in a very weird time in my life with multiple challenging situations in front of me, and on top of a regular workload. So I do not have my crap together right now. And I think just acknowledging that I do not have my crap together has been extremely helpful, because I am able to say to people, "Yes, I can do that thing for you. It's going to take me a little extra longer because I do not have my crap together."

Allissa Haines:

But learning to say that, and you know what? Michael and I had a meeting with somebody once and they no-showed. And we emailed and we were like, "Hey, we thought we had this meeting." And the guy emailed back and said, "I'm so sorry. I thought I had canceled everything on my calendar. I..." What did he say? An emergent tragedy or emergent situation. And that was it. Didn't explain himself any further than saying, "I am having an emergency situation and I had to clear..." Or it was a emergent medical thing. I don't know. It was something like... But he said it very clearly, like, "I have crap going down and I'm sorry, but I'm not that sorry."

Allissa Haines:

And it really impacted me. So now I feel very comfortable saying, "No, I cannot fit you in," and not even having to explain why, or, "Nope, I can not do my normal turnaround on that. It's definitely going to take me two weeks." But to do it in a way that is not like feel bad for me, everything sad is happening. It's just, this is life. And I found people are a lot more flexible about that kind of thing nowadays anyway.

Michael Reynolds:

So Vanita-

Allissa Haines:

Forgot where I was going with that.

Michael Reynolds:

Oh, I was going to pop in a comment from Vanita on Facebook. Posted a comment on the topic here saying, "Yes, it is hard, but I've had to not talk about anything negative, Allissa says whole"-

Allissa Haines:

While massaging.

Michael Reynolds:

... "while massaging if I've had a bad day." So, yeah.

Allissa Haines:

Yeah. Yeah.

Michael Reynolds:

Thanks for sharing, Vanita.

Allissa Haines:

Yeah, it's, you know, especially when we have these close relationships with clients we've known over a long time, it can be hard to be like, "No, bad stuff's going down with my kid." You know, you don't want to say that because it's their massage. So it's tricky. Anyhow, way longer than I intended. I apologize. What's next, Michael?

Michael Reynolds:

Jojoba.

Allissa Haines:

Yay. Jojoba, something happy to talk about. Thanks, The Original Jojoba Company. The Jojoba Company is the only company in the world that carries 100% pure first press-quality jojoba. We are delighted to be partnering with them. Why? I'll tell you why. Non-comedogenic. It's not going to clog your pores, so if you have a client that is prone to acne breakouts, jojoba will not cause that reaction. In fact, jojoba can help to clean out and clear the pore.

Allissa Haines:

I will tell you that when I traveled a few different times last week, which is also part of why I'm such a crap show right now, the only cosmetic thing I brought me with me was my little sample size half-ounce jojoba because it is great for washing my face with and then moisturizing my face with, and then lip balm, and then dry hands from being in dry places. It's really the only thing I needed, like toothpaste, deodorant, jojoba. Yay. Super easy to travel with that. You can get 20% off the price of the product when you shop through our link, massagebusinessblueprint.com/jojoba.

Michael Reynolds:

Thanks, jojoba.

Allissa Haines:

I have no quick tips. Tell me about yours.

Michael Reynolds:

I have one. This came from our Blueprint Mastermind community. So we have lots of great conversations in the community, and one of those questions this past week was on finances. It was a financial question about, hey, what do you think about this? And we had a good conversation about it. And one of the points that came up was emergency fund. I was giving some feedback and talking about emergency funds. So I'm going to share this tidbit of it as a quick tip.

Michael Reynolds:

So I think it's really important that we have both a business and a personal emergency fund. I think a lot of times it's very tempting as solo business owners to treat our business like a piggy bank and our emergency fund and everything else, and just kind of dump everything into that and call that our financial thing, whatever that thing may be, emergency fund or what. So it's really important to have separation, I think, in your finances. And your business deserves its own emergency fund, and your personal household deserves its own emergency fund. So whether you are managing your finances as an individual or a couple, that household should have its own emergency fund. Your business may have stuff come up that requires its own emergency fund, and your personal household may have stuff come up as well. And those are going to be often two different things.

Michael Reynolds:

And so technically, yes, if you have a personal emergency come up and you have to write yourself a check from your business, take a distribution and pull it out, yes, you can do that, but then your business emergency fund is no longer there and you're going to have to rebuild that. So I think it's really important that we don't treat our businesses like our emergency funds, or I use the word piggy bank a lot because it's kind of like, oh, it's just where I kind of pull money from. It's really important to have both. Your personal emergency funds should be established. Typically, the rule of thumb is three to six months of expenses, but it's unique for everybody, but that's kind the rule of thumb. And your business should have its own, because they're two different entities that deserve two different emergency funds. That's my quick tip.

Allissa Haines:

Oh, it's so much work, Michael.

Michael Reynolds:

I know. It's so boring. Saving money. I know.

Allissa Haines:

Anything else? Any more good comments before we... I'm just scrolling the comments because I haven't been looking at them. I've been letting you do that. But if-

Michael Reynolds:

No, no more comments-

Allissa Haines:

That looks like it.

Michael Reynolds:

... as of this moment. So if anymore pop in, I may catch them, but that's all I have so far.

Allissa Haines:

So let me say this. If you have a question or topic you would like us to cover on the podcast, you can email us, podcast@massagebusinessblueprint.com. If you like what you hear, if you think we're interesting, consider joining our mastermind community. It is $19.99 a month or $15.99 if you're an ABMP member, or maybe $14.99 if you're an ABMP member.

Michael Reynolds:

$14.99.

Allissa Haines:

I don't... Yeah, so there's that. You can learn more about that at massagebusinessblueprint.com/mastermind. Oh, there's a deer outside my window. This is so exciting. Okay, sorry. Another live thing in the [crosstalk 00:30:24] because I moved.

Michael Reynolds:

I'm playing our outro music. We're wrapping this up.

Allissa Haines:

Michael, wrap it up. I'm taking a picture of the deer.

Michael Reynolds:

All right, let's do this. Well, Allissa pretty much said it all, but reminder, our website is massagebusinessblueprint.com. We'd love to hear from you. If you want to join us live again, that's 9:00 AM Eastern on Wednesday mornings as well. Thanks, everyone. Have a great day. We will see you...

Allissa Haines:

I'll put a picture of the deer in the show notes and also the Facebook feed.

Michael Reynolds:

... next time.

Allissa Haines:

He's-

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