Podcast

Episode 411

Apr 27, 2022

Asking for reviews can feel awkward. We’ll nail down the least-cringy and most effective ways to encourage clients to leave you a great review.

Listen to "E411: Asking for Google Reviews" on Spreaker.
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EPISODE 411

Weekly Roundup

  • Read your state regulations.

Discussion Topic

  • Asking for Google Reviews

Quick Tips

  • How to make a QR code
  • Spend some time getting good at managing your calendar

Sponsors


Transcript:

Sponsor message:

This episode is sponsored by Happyface. Face cradles can be super uncomfortable for a client, and that pressure and stuffiness can ruin the whole massage experience. Happyface is the most comfy face cradle, and you can give the most relaxing massage of your client's life. The innovative heart-shaped design means the less sinus pressure, less eye pressure, less need to adjust mid massage, no wrinkles or makeup smearing. People love it. It is made in the USA. It is seamless, so it's super easy to clean. I'm going to add my little editorial here. One of my friends using the Happyface mentioned that by starting a massage face down with Happyface and then flipping the client so they are supine and then lifting ... She's got a tilt table ... So lifting the head of the tilt table just a tiny bit so there's a little bit of incline has pretty much eliminated client stuffiness. I tried this the other day. Totally worked. A client who normally is super stuffy with seasonal allergies stuff: no stuffiness. It was awesome. I didn't have to do extra face work. They got off my table, and they were not stuffy. So that is my plug for Happyface. You can get 20% off your entire purchase at massagebusinessblueprint.com/happyface, using code massagebb at checkout. That's massagebusinessblueprint.com/happyface.

Michael Reynolds:

Hey, everyone. Welcome to the Massage Business Blueprint Podcast, where we help you attract more clients, make more money and improve your quality of life. I'm Michael Reynolds.

Allissa Haines:

I'm Allissa Haines.

Michael Reynolds:

We're your hosts. Welcome to our show today. We're glad you're here. Allissa, I have nothing that I've been reading that's interesting at all. You have something that sounds particularly juicy, so tell me more about your state-

Allissa Haines:

I do.

Michael Reynolds:

Regulations?

Allissa Haines:

Actually I have two things.

Michael Reynolds:

Two things. Okay. Perfect.

Allissa Haines:

I do. I forgot to put one down.

Michael Reynolds:

Even better.

Allissa Haines:

First thing I've been reading is gardening guides and such and also the labels on the plants that I buy. I bought a Scotch broom plant the other day because we're delawning. So we're pretty much getting rid of the entire lawn by planting various plants and shrubs and doing weed mat around them and then mulching. So by the end of next summer we're not going to have any green lawn, which is awesome because lawns are terrible for the environment. We're creating habitats for butterflies and hummingbirds.

Allissa Haines:

Anyhow, so I bought a Scotch broom plant because I went to Home Depot the other day and just wanted to get some garden plants. I brought it home, and I put everything I bought into the front lawn. Then I was reading the label later, and I looked it up online and it's a borderline invasive species. It has almost made the actual official invasive species list for the Northeast last time they re-upped the list 10 years ago.

Allissa Haines:

So this morning I had to dig up my Scotch broom and put it back in the pot and I'm returning it to Home Depot because invasive species are bad for the environment. They start taking over all of the other natural stuff and they mess with the ecosystem. Pro tip: don't just read the labels of the plants at the store. You should look them up online because it's not illegal to sell it because it's not quite on the invasive species list, but it's really close. Pro tip: look things up online before you buy them. So maybe a little less spontaneous gardening.

Michael Reynolds:

Good to know.

Allissa Haines:

Yeah, there you go. We're calling it chaos gardening, which is pretty much buy a package of seeds of native wild flowers and till the lawn and then throw them on and whatever. Chaos gardening. That's my life.

Allissa Haines:

What I have actually been reading a lot of lately again, as always, bookmarked in my browser, is my state massage regulations regarding facility licensure and practitioner licensure and standards of practice and documentation. The most recent reason that I was diving into them is because in a local massage discussion group someone was like, "This potential new client didn't want to fill out the intake form. What do you do when this happens?" It's a great question. Maybe we'll talk about this soon in another podcast episode. Your requirements vary state by state, but a bunch of Massachusetts massage therapists hopped in to be like, "Well, that's illegal. We need to have one. You just tell them that we can't legally work on them unless we have the required documentation." Folks, that ain't true. It's just not true.

Allissa Haines:

I was like, "I don't even think this is true," because I told someone that they had to have a written intake a couple of years ago. I told this to one of the massage therapists and then I went and looked it up and I was completely wrong. Massachusetts does not require a written intake. They actually don't even require massage documentation of treatments for, and I'm going to air quote this, "relaxation massage," which is the stupidest rule ever, but again, other podcast episode. But there's a lot of reasons one might ask for an intake and require one, but state law ain't it. Massage regulations and standards of practice and documentation in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts ain't it folks.

Allissa Haines:

So, anyhow, I commented in the thread and said, "Listen, it's not required by the state. Here's a link to," and I literally copied and pasted Section 5:003, and I pasted the link to the state regs. I pasted in that portion of the rules, of the regulations. I said, "It's not required by the state. Here's where you can verify that. However, here are the reasons you might want to request a full intake, and here's what you could potentially tell a client."

Allissa Haines:

There's this chick in the group who's arguing with me. She's like, "Well, you should look at the other woman's comment above." I was like, "I looked at the other woman's comment above, and it just says, 'I think I remember that it's required by the state.'" I'm like, "Why are you telling me to look at somebody who thinks they remember something when I'm literally giving you the regulation word for word that very clearly," and she's just literally sending me like private messages and harassing me. "It's required. It should be required." I'm like, "I'm not going to argue with you about something that's very clearly written in black and white." Anyhow, girl be cray-cray.

Allissa Haines:

The best way to get an answer to these kinds of questions is to just go to your state regs. Now, I know not everybody has state regulations and licensure. There's certainly a lot of gray area in our, in my, state licensure stuff. But this ain't part of that. This is not a gray area. So my encouragement to you, everyone ... This should be a quick tip, I guess ... Don't say something because you think you remember that's how it was. Because 90% of the crap we say is stuff that we think we remember an instructor saying or we think we remember from the last time we looked at the licensure stuff, and it's usually wrong. Unless you have seen something in black and white, it's probably hearsay and completely incorrect or partially incorrect or very gray area. That is my diatribe for today. The whole thing makes me bonkers. Sue, you know who you are, stop fricking harassing me. Not that she's listening to this podcast. She's been wrong about 10 other things so she kind of has it in for me. Oh my God. I'm done.

Michael Reynolds:

That's usually the realm of mansplainers, so I'm impressed that Sue did her part there.

Allissa Haines:

It's someone who's been in massage for a long time, I think maybe taught at one point and thinks they know everything off the top of their head, which is not possible for all of us. Ugh. I've been there and I actually in this thread, I tagged the woman that I had incorrectly told this to years ago. I was like, "Nina, I'm really sorry I told you that." She was like, "No biggie. It was a kick in the pants to get my documentation together." I was like, "But it's not true. Just so you know."

Michael Reynolds:

All right.

Allissa Haines:

That's it. I'm done.

Michael Reynolds:

Thanks for sharing. Good stuff.

Allissa Haines:

Sorry about the rant.

Michael Reynolds:

Oh no.

Allissa Haines:

I'm mad I have to go to back to Home Depot today to return that stupid plant, so there you are.

Michael Reynolds:

All right. Well, before we move on to our sponsor, just a reminder, we've got a few people joining us live today via Facebook and YouTube. Feel free to pop your comments and questions in there. We will pause between each section and bring comments and questions on screen and chat about them if applicable. Before we move on, let's shout out to ABMP. Right as you take a drink. You like how I timed that right as you take a drink?

Allissa Haines:

Yeah. No it's my bad. Yeah. I'm going to change my tune and be happy and perky for the rest of this. Michael and I are both in persnickety moods, but we're going to pump it up now. Listen, because ABMP deserves nothing but our best. They say they're proud to sponsor our podcast, and we believe them.

Allissa Haines:

Let's talk about the many, many benefits of ABMP. You can access their super awesome, easy-to-use fast apps: the ABMP Five-Minute Muscle app and the ABMP Pocket Pathology. If you have last-minute things you need to look up when a client comes in the door with a scary condition or someone comes in and they're like, "I have tennis elbow," and you can't remember if that's the top of the elbow or the bottom of the elbow, you can look it up super quick on either of these apps, which you can find at abmp.com/apps.

Allissa Haines:

I'm doing a speed ABMP here where I'm covering all three of the things we normally feature individually. ABMP also has the amazing Massage and Bodywork Magazine, award winning and available for free to the entire profession online. You can access that through their homepage as well. We write a column.

Allissa Haines:

Last, but certainly not least, the ABMP education center, 600 plus hours of continuing education courses included with your ABMP membership and offered for a ridiculously reasonable price, even for non-members. I will say that buying a course through ABMP as a non-member is actually cheaper than getting a course from the other major organization that charges even if you are a member. So maybe you should go to abp.com/learn and check that out.

Allissa Haines:

This bit of persnicketiness was not sanctioned by ABMP, so sorry. You can learn all about them and all of their amazing benefits and liability insurance and property add-on insurance and all of these things at abmp.com. Check them out.

Michael Reynolds:

All right. Before we move on, shout out to Marcy who is joining us today and says, 'I dropped out of a few LMT groups because of people like Sue."

Allissa Haines:

Yeah. I know, I've actually left all of the big national groups and stuff, because it's not good for my blood pressure. I stayed in the two Massachusetts groups, although in this particular ... There's two groups. In one of them, I actually can't post an organic post. So I think I must have pissed off one of the organizers, the moderators of that group at one point, because I'm blocked from doing new posts.

Michael Reynolds:

Sounds about right.

Allissa Haines:

Yeah. So sounds good. But whatever.

Michael Reynolds:

All right.

Allissa Haines:

So Michael, tell us about our topic today.

Michael Reynolds:

Let's talk about Google reviews. Asking for Google reviews.

Allissa Haines:

Yeah. Asking for all kinds of reviews, we're specifically targeting Google because I found them to be the most useful in terms of search engine optimization and integrating with your Google business profile. So we're getting a little specific to Google reviews, but this absolutely applies to everything.

Allissa Haines:

Why do you even care? Why should you care about this at all? Mostly it's because Google loves itself, and Google reviews are going to increase your online exposure and help with search engine optimization, especially with local SEO. SEO is search engine optimization. When people are searching on local maps and stuff, your business is going to pop up better if you've done more integrating with all the different Google tools. According to Moz, which is a big marketing, digital marketing kind of org and resource, almost 10% of Google's entire algorithm is driven by signals originating from Google reviews.

Allissa Haines:

Since Google is trying to provide people with the best results for their search query, online reviews are a really good indicator as to whether other people, other users of Google, like your business, and the number of reviews absolutely plays a role in that. So it's a good thing to do if you're trying to get more traffic to your website, if you need new clients. Using those Google tools is going to be much more advantageous to you than not using those Google tools.

Allissa Haines:

So the question is, "How do I get these reviews?" It pretty much comes down to being willing to feel a little bit uncomfortable or awkward. Doesn't mean being salesy, it just means being willing to feel a little bit uncomfortable and awkward the first couple times you do it. I personally like the most automated hands-off way, which for me is a follow-up email that automatically sends after an appointment. I can do this integrated with my online scheduling system. If you're not using online scheduling system or your service doesn't have that, you've got to do this manually. But less than two minutes a day of work to do this if you have to do a manual email. So my email automatically sends to people a couple of days after their appointment ... I don't have this going all the time ... I do it for one or two quarters every year because I don't want to be bugging regular clients after every single appointment asking for a review. That's dumb.

Allissa Haines:

So I do this one quarter a year to boost up my reviews, and I send a follow-up email and it says, "Hope you're feeling great since your last appointment. If you," and you can word this anyway you want, but mine is loosely, "If you feel like I provide a good service, I would love for you to leave a Google review," and you can put your link right in there. Put a link to where they go to leave the Google review and then that's it. That's all you do. If you see 20 clients over a couple of weeks and you send each of them an email, three or four might do that, and that's nice. You don't want to bombard your Google page with a ton of reviews all at once because then it looks kind of fake and weird. So this is a process. This is something you should do over a few months or regularly on occasion. You can do that follow-up email.

Allissa Haines:

Another thing is outside of the automated emails, you can actually put this in your regular email signature. So if you do any kind of emailing with clients here and there or anyone out in the world, put it in your email signature. One of my friends uses the verbiage, "Wonderful clients beget wonderful clients. Leave a Google review here," with the link. That verbiage comes from my friend, Melissa, who has a really successful practice. It just says very clearly, "I appreciate you, and if you tell the world that you appreciate me, it's going to help my business." People understand how small businesses work and how important reviews can be. So the good clients who really appreciate you are going to do this and it's worth your effort.

Allissa Haines:

Now, if you're starting from scratch and you don't have a lot of clients to send follow-up emails to, then this is a little bit different. You can send an email request to people you've practiced on, as when you were a student before you started up or people you have worked on, whatever, outside of your business, again, kind of as a practice or colleagues that you have traded with or friends and family. You can send them an email and say, "Hey, I'm looking to build up my business a little bit. It would be super helpful for me, it would help people find me online if you could leave a review here," and you give them the link.

Allissa Haines:

So sometimes you just have to ask. Make it a legit ask. Don't be asking friends and family that you have not massaged. Make it a legit ask and people that you trust. You could also perhaps set up a trade with another massage therapist or go and pay or offer a massage straight out to another massage therapist that you maybe know or maybe have gone and paid for their services and say, "Hey, I'm starting up." It helps if you have a different specialty than them. If you emphasize that, "You do mostly migraine work and general work and I'm doing this other thing like knee rehab. Would you consider coming to get a massage for me and maybe leaving a review for me? That would really help."

Allissa Haines:

You could leave a review for them as well. That can be a nice way to build up a little collaborative relationship. You can put a small sign at your desk if you have a QR code. Make a QR code, and Michael can talk to you about how to do that. I think we have a whole episode or it's a quick tip or something. You can make a little sign, an actual printed sign with a QR code that links to your business review page. You can put that in your office on your little desk or you could even put it in your treatment room. You don't want it to be big and ostentatious. You don't want people to walk into your massage room and be like, "Oh great. They're asking for a review, and I haven't even gotten massage yet." Make this appropriate for your style. You can put that QR code in emails. You can put it all over the place and ask people. That makes it easy for people to link in and just write the review right then.

Allissa Haines:

I'm going to wrap this up by saying again, you just need to be willing to ask. You don't have to nag. You don't have to ask more than once. But I do think it's worth the effort to ask all of your clients one time at least, once a year at least to leave you a review. Just find a way to do it that is most comfortable for you. Again, ask friends and family that you trust and you won't feel quite as awkward asking. Never ever, ever pay for or incentivize reviews. Do not offer someone an extra 15 minutes for leaving you a review. If someone leaves you a review, unsolicited or otherwise, do not give them a gift for doing that. Just say, "Thank you." Send them a thank-you note, email or written, actual whatever. To pay for or incentivize reviews violates Google's terms of service. It's just kind of bad karma and creepy, so don't do that. That is what I have to say.

Michael Reynolds:

Love it. Really, really useful. I think this is probably one of the most impactful things you can do. It won't be overnight like you said, but over the course of a few months or a year when you have this process going, you're probably going to see significant increase in your search engine optimization efforts. Glad you touched on this.

Allissa Haines:

Yeah, hopefully.

Michael Reynolds:

Thank you.

Allissa Haines:

Any good comments coming in?

Michael Reynolds:

We did. Alexander is joining us via Facebook and he says, "SEO is great for me and my business here in Eastern Iowa." Awesome. Good to hear.

Allissa Haines:

Alexander's been doing full-time mobile massage for years and just nailing it.

Michael Reynolds:

Sounds like SEO is working. Thanks, Alexander. Appreciate you stopping by. All right. So before we move on, let's give a shout out to our next sponsor, the Original Jojoba Company.

Allissa Haines:

Yay, Jojoba. I didn't flip my page with my notes long enough, although I could do this one from memory.

Michael Reynolds:

I'm sure you were expecting my Jojoba shout, but I changed it up a little bit today.

Allissa Haines:

That's right. Here, I'm going to close my eyes and do this from memory. Ready? This episode is sponsored by the Original Jojoba Company. I firmly believe that massage therapists should only be using the highest quality products because it's important for our clients' bodies and important for our bodies. I'm going to editorialize here ... Still with my eyes closed ... I went for a massage yesterday, and I love my local massage therapist, but she uses sunflower oil she gets at Trader Joe's. I get home and I have to immediately take a shower, and then the bottom of my tub is slippery and it's terrible. So I'm bringing her a bottle of Jojoba next time I go.

Michael Reynolds:

Aw, that's sweet.

Allissa Haines:

Yeah, she's lovely. It's just not a great product. But part of the reason I love Jojoba is because it is non-allergenic, which means you can use it on any client and every client safely without worrying about any kind of nut allergy or any kind of allergy. It's also non-comedogenic, so if you've got people with acne issues or they're prone to clogged pores in any way, this is really good for them. It's great for facial massage because of this ... If I ever massage people's faces again. Yeah. So you, my friends, I have to actually go to my notes for this because I got a little off track there ... 20% off the price of the product because we love you and Jojoba loves you when you shop through our link at massagebusinessblueprint.com/jojoba.

Michael Reynolds:

Thanks, Jojoba. All right. Quick tip time. Do you have anything to add or should I jump in?

Allissa Haines:

You go first. You've got two of them and the second one's going to be a little ranty so I'm excited.

Michael Reynolds:

Okay. I'll try not to be too ranty. Oh, by the way, before we move on, Marcy jumped in with a comment here. Marcy says, "Love, live, love." Maybe she meant to say love, love, love, but it says, "Love, live love." Maybe it's both. My Jojoba.

Allissa Haines:

Because I have a Jojoba where I live. It's in my residence as well for multiple uses.

Michael Reynolds:

Jojoba life. Yeah. Thanks, Marcy. Love, live, life, Jojoba.

Allissa Haines:

Jojoba life.

Michael Reynolds:

There's some phrase in there that works. Okay. So first quick tip, spontaneously, I just added this because we talked about QR codes. So yeah, I will share at least the way I make QR codes.

Michael Reynolds:

There are lots of ways to make QR codes, but the way I use is with a Chrome browser. You don't have to use Chrome all the time, but if you want to make a QR code, just download the Chrome browser, and then when you look at a website, in the toolbar in the upper right at the end of the address bar, you'll see a little icon, a little QR code square icon. If you click it, it'll generate a QR code for free. So any time you want to make the QR code, crack open the Chrome browser, look at the site you want to link to, and then just that little icon and it'll pop up a QR code you can then download and print and use. So it also has a little dinosaur inside of it. It's really cute. A little Google dinosaur symbol or the little Mozilla dinosaur symbol, because anyway. So that's the way to make a QR code for free. There are lots of ways. That's how I do it.

Allissa Haines:

What's your second quick tip, Michael?

Michael Reynolds:

Okay. My second quick tip is, spend some time getting good at managing your calendar. There's probably a whole podcast episode we'll do on this because there's a lot of logistics about details of managing your calendar. But I want to say this because I have noticed a pattern of those who are able to get things done and take action and move forward in their businesses and accomplish things generally are able to manage their calendar well. Those who kind of struggle with this and who have challenges getting things done, challenges just moving forward in their business, there seems to be a pattern in that they don't really have a trusted calendar system. They don't use their calendar effectively. They don't put things in their calendar. They don't have reminders. They don't block things off. Maybe they have too many calendars that aren't synchronized together. Maybe they're using half calendaring, half post-it notes.

Michael Reynolds:

There's a lot of a pattern there when you tie in accomplishing actions and productivity to calendaring. I've noticed that again, there's a real clear relationship between being able to effectively manage your calendar and moving forward in your business. So if you're struggling with multiple calendars that aren't syncing together or you don't have a good system or you don't have good habits of putting things in your calendar and making that your trusted landscape of what you're doing day to day, it's really important in my opinion. Learning to manage your calendar well and getting really good at it and spending the time to create the right systems, choose the right tools, the right habits, it's really going to help you move forward in your business. That is my quick tip that I will attempt to maybe expand on in the future in another context. But I just want to state that as just something to consider. Calendaring is hyper important to your productivity and your business.

Allissa Haines:

Yeah. I want to reiterate that there is no perfect system. There is just the system that you use that works best for you and that probably is going to need to adapt regularly. Also, these things, they take a little bit of time to kick in. So I live with three people who have ADHD, and I'm probably right on the edge of having it myself so it's really important that everyone in my house learns good systems for keeping track of their lives. This isn't just a business thing because it sucks to be missing dentist appointments and have to pay for that missed appointment fee. Also, it's just a pain in the neck.

Allissa Haines:

So learning to utilize a calendar, and I know that some people love paper and if it works for you, that's awesome ... But if you are someone who forgets things, forgets to look at that paper calendar every day or forgets to put things in there because you don't have your calendar with you, that definitely indicates maybe the need for something that can alert you to events a little better.

Allissa Haines:

So in my world, it's Google Calendar, but there's lots of other people. If you're totally a Mac person, you could totally use iCal or whatever, Outlook calendars or whatever ... Whatever works well with your device so that you can set up, when it's important to you, could set up alerts for things. Now, I do not set up alerts for every event in my calendar. I am not going to forget typically or get distracted really early on a Wednesday morning and forget that I have to show up for podcast recording at 9:00 that's only happened one time and it's because we changed the time of the recording. But I will absolutely forget that I have an 11:30 meeting today if I don't have my calendar set so that something will ping on my computer and something will ping on my phone.

Allissa Haines:

Is there a chance that I am going to be away from my phone or computer and not hear that ping? Sure. Things happen. But that's a much smaller chance than if I'm going to forget the meeting because I don't set up any alerts. So if you are someone who is prone to forgetting to check your calendar the night before, the morning of, or forgetting something before it happens even if you do check your calendar, which happens to me ... In the disability world, we call it an accommodation, structure to accommodate your brain stuff. In my world, for me, I just call it accommodating my own stupidity, which is probably not fair to say that it's stupidity because it's not. It's a normal physiological thing in my brain. But we set up a lot of systems to accommodate our weaknesses, and this is one of them. So it's worth spending even if all your brain can manage is 15 minutes at a time a couple times a week to learn, to accomplish the learning curve of using your calendar properly ... Properly means as it best suits you ... It's worth the effort.

Michael Reynolds:

I'll add one more sub tip to that related to our community. So if you're a member of Blueprint Mastermind, actually other systems like this, make use of the little button that says, add to your calendar. In our community, if you RSVP to an Office Hours, for example, you'll say, "Yes, I'm going," and it will pop up and say, "Hey, would you like to add this to your calendar?" It gives you options to click on Google calendar or whatever other calendaring systems are pretty common. You can click on that, click a button and it will add it to your Google calendar. Many people just don't do that. Do that, and then you'll show up to Office Hours because you remember because it's on your calendar. Make use of those tools. Do everything you can to make it easier for you to manage the stuff you want to do.

Allissa Haines:

Yeah.

Michael Reynolds:

All right. I think we've ranted enough on that probably.

Allissa Haines:

Yeah. [Ciquina 00:28:19] made a note that she could probably calendar better and is looking forward to a future episode on that. So yeah.

Michael Reynolds:

All right.

Allissa Haines:

We can definitely do an episode on that.

Michael Reynolds:

We will make that happen.

Allissa Haines:

We should do a webinar on that.

Michael Reynolds:

Ooh. That would be a good webinar because we can visualize it and show tool ... Yes. That's a good webinar.

Allissa Haines:

We're going to do a Google calendar webinar. That's going to be exciting.

Michael Reynolds:

There you go. Thanks, Ciquina, for the idea. We will run with that. All right. Anything else you would add for today?

Allissa Haines:

No, I think we've ranted at people enough.

Michael Reynolds:

Okay. Are we ready to announce the accountability course or is that later?

Allissa Haines:

No, we're not ready to announce.

Michael Reynolds:

Okay. Maybe next week? All right. We'll-

Allissa Haines:

Okay. Let's teaser this. Listen, for members of our private community you're going to get an announcement later today, which is Wednesday, April 20th that we're going to be running an accountability group where we have live meetings and check-in and power hours to accomplish a particular task in our business. So for non-premium Mastermind Community members, if this is something that interests, you should totally, now is a good time to look into membership at massagebusinessblueprint.com/mastermind. Just go to our main website and click the little Mastermind button, and you can learn about our private community because we are going to be offering this get your crap together, accomplish and finish this project that you want to be finishing.

Allissa Haines:

We're going to do an accountability group for it with regular meetings and all of these things. If it goes well, we're going to just keep offering six weeks at a time, a six-week course. So I don't have any links. I don't have much more information for you at this time. But if it interests you, keep your eyes open in the community or join the community.

Michael Reynolds:

Yeah. It's free for 30 days so you can even just join and check it out and maybe pay for a month or two. We want you to stay but there's no obligation. It's all month to month. You get a free month. There's zero commitment or obligation. So try us out. See if you like it and it's up to you. So we'd love to have you join. All right. Anything else? Are we finally done ranting?

Allissa Haines:

Done.

Michael Reynolds:

All right. Thanks everyone for joining us today. As always, you can find us at massagebusinessblueprint.com. Whoops, wrong music. Oh my goodness. I'm terrible at my job. All right. So thanks everyone again. Massagebusinessblueprint.com is our website. You can email us at podcast@massagebusinessblueprint.com and we will see that. We often, actually always, answer. As always, thanks for joining us today. Have a great day. We will see you next time.

Allissa Haines:

[inaudible 00:30:52]

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