Podcast

Episode 408

Apr 1, 2022

Do you struggle with coming up for content to post on social media? Michael and Allissa go through a bunch of ideas of what you can use.

Listen to "E408: How to Consistently Come Up With Social Media Content" on Spreaker.
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EPISODE 408

Weekly Roundup

  • Introducing my dear friend, Allissa Haines

Discussion Topic

Quick Tips

  • Tell the people in your life that you love them. Don’t be afraid to feel silly about it.

Sponsors


Transcript: 

Sponsor message: 

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Allissa Haines:

Hey, everyone. Welcome to The Massage Business Blueprint Podcast, where we help you attract more clients, make more money, and improve your quality of life. I am Allissa Haines.

Michael Reynolds:

And I'm Michael Reynolds.

Allissa Haines:

And we're your hosts. How's it going today, Michael?

Michael Reynolds:

Going great. How about you?

Allissa Haines:

It's going okay. I'm making a lot of weird little mistakes, but it's just going to be fine. It's been quite ... A lot has happened for it only being 9:00 AM, at this, the time of our recording.

Michael Reynolds:

Well, you seem like you're mostly on your game despite that, so thanks for being here. And I noticed that you sent me a photo of your Mesh, Google Mesh thing out in your backyard in the grass between your house and your office in the backyard. So we're hoping your device and your mesh network holds up today. We'll see.

Allissa Haines:

Well, here's hoping, man. So you're pretty much covering this whole episode. I have done little to no prep because you had it all firmly in hand. So tell me, and I can't even ... Whatever is in the podcast notes right now is ridiculous. But Michael, what have you been reading?

Michael Reynolds:

I knew you would think so. So I've not been reading, I've been writing. And I'm going to share something today, a little bit off the wall, a little bit different. It'll probably embarrass you, so I apologize in advance. But last week, we talked about the confirmation hearings of Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson, and just how ridiculous it was and blah, blah, blah. And you were bringing up a video of her friend, Professor Lisa Fairfax, introducing her, and all the kind things she said. And the video was just really touching and just kind of just observing that, which is really beautiful. And you'd mentioned something when you were talking about that. You said, I quote, "I want a friend who thinks as highly of me as Professor Lisa Fairfax feels about Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson."

Michael Reynolds:

So I thought to myself, "Challenge accepted." So I'm going to read a little something I wrote over the past week because, hey, I thought episode 408 is as good a time as any to share my thoughts about you and our friendship, and how much I respect and value you as well. So this is probably going to be good for people who are maybe new listeners, as kind of an introduction to who you are. And those who've been listening for a while, again, it's just a good way to show appreciation I think. So I want to read a little something I wrote for you, Allissa.

Allissa Haines:

Am I going to cry like Ketanji Brown Jackson did?

Michael Reynolds:

You'll probably make fun of me, so don't worry about it.

Allissa Haines:

Okay. Folks, we usually do this on our birthdays because Michael and I both have birthdays in May, so we always put up a nice birthday message to each other, so this is like an early birthday thing. But bring it, I'm ready.

Michael Reynolds:

Yeah. Well, I thought we could wait until our birthday, but I'm in the mood lately to just kind of spontaneously do things in the moment. So anyway, I'm going to read a little something I wrote. So I'd like to introduce my dear friend, Allissa Haines. Allissa and I met in 2010 at the AMT National Convention in Minneapolis. We'd been in touch virtually before that and hit it off immediately due to our dry humor, love of marketing work, intolerance for ass-hattery, general crankiness about the state of politics in the massage professional. And we immediately realized that we were destined to take over the world together, or at least the world of massage. We spent the next few years paying our dues through volunteering and consulting with various massage organizations and related businesses. We did some teaching, some consulting, and we did our best to make a difference in the profession.

Michael Reynolds:

One thing I noticed early on about Allissa was her fierce desire for making the world a better place. She doesn't just want things to be better, she refuses to tolerate anything other than clear action toward this goal. She understands and notices issues that others don't. She has empathy for those often overlooked by everyone else. She has a strong sense of right and wrong and she is bold and courageous in voicing her contributions. When it comes to her credentials, skill and experience, Allissa is at the top of her game. She has a long history of running a successful massage practice. She's focused on consistency while not being afraid to try new things, and learning from the experience. And she dives into learning and has developed an advanced level of competence in business and marketing in the massage community.

Michael Reynolds:

Allissa is sought after in the massage profession and known by most as a leading voice in the community. From her work with major players like ABMP, to her teaching through industry events, excuse me, to her leadership at Massage Business Blueprint, she provides powerful and moving insights to massage therapists in need of help and support. Her work literally changes lives. I've seen countless massage therapists get unstuck and make dramatic leaps forward as a result of Allissa's help. Allissa is one of the highest quality humans I've ever known. She takes her humanity and her role in our society seriously. She speaks out against injustices of all kinds and fights to elevate our cultural consciousness through thoughtful interactions with others and through education.

Michael Reynolds:

Allissa's a strong and reliable business partner and someone you can always count on. There's never been a time what I felt that she did not have my back. When Allissa commits to something, she is all in. Those who work with her never have to worry about her commitment to her responsibilities. She will be there for you always. Finally, Allissa's a dear friend. She will listen when life is falling apart. She will lovingly tell you when you're being an ass hat. She will help you when you need help. And she will make you a better person. I cherish our friendship and I'm so incredibly grateful to be a friend and business partner to this wonderful human. Thank you for being you, Allissa.

Allissa Haines:

Aw, thank you. I'm not going to be able to top that ever. So thank you, everyone, for listening to our gushing about each other.

Michael Reynolds:

And now we'll move on.

Allissa Haines:

Yes. We'll move on. Once we've forgotten how good Michael's thing was, I'll do one. But I don't want to be compared to his.

Michael Reynolds:

No need, no need.

Allissa Haines:

That's part of what it is.

Michael Reynolds:

You deserve all of it. All right, so that is what I've been working on this past week.

Allissa Haines:

Yeah. And I'm in the middle of a couple of different books and stuff, so I don't have anything to share, and I haven't even been listening to any good podcasts. I haven't been listening to podcasts lately because I feel like I'm just kind of done with all the ones I normally listen to. So I have ... Oh, except I am listening to ABMP's Friday broadcast, which are Ruth Werner's, I Have a Client Who, pathology episodes. And last Friday's about hiatal hernias was really, really good. So I guess that's my, I've been reading slash listening to. It was really interesting. And I learned a whole bunch of stuff that I didn't know about hiatal hernia, so there's that.

Michael Reynolds:

Right on.

Allissa Haines:

Speaking of ABMP.

Michael Reynolds:

Hey, they're our next sponsor.

Allissa Haines:

They're our next sponsor. Well, let's talk about their podcast then, since that's ... You know what, that's actually not one of our official talking points.

Michael Reynolds:

But hey, they have a cool podcast.

Allissa Haines:

We're going to do it anyway. I'm improvising. Hi Darren and Jed. So yeah, abmp.com/podcast is going to give you the entire archive of the ABMP Podcast, which is phenomenal. They publish one episode a week that is typically Kristin Coverland ... Oh, my God. Kristin Coverly.

Michael Reynolds:

There you go.

Allissa Haines:

And Darren Buford, and they are usually interviewing someone interesting in the massage field. I just listened to, I don't know if it was this week's or last week's with Rachel Beider, who is a really, really interesting massage therapist who has grown to a huge staff, a couple of locations, and is also a business coach. And I've got to tell you, I don't really like a lot of business coaches and I really loved this episode, and I really loved her. They do a Thursday episode with Allison Denny, the rebel MT, where she talks about some kind of anatomical pathological hands on approach in massage, and it's really, really good. And then we already just talked about Friday's Ruth Werner episodes, I Have a Client Who, which is really great. I actually have a real neat complex client situation that I'm going to send in to her. I'm just waiting to see the client again to get permission to talk about the case.

Allissa Haines:

And yeah, you can check all of that out at abmp.com/podcast. You can find all kinds of other things there. You can find all the digital issues of Massage and Body Work Magazine. The ABMP Education Center, which we've talked about before, has a ton of CE courses. And yeah, abmp.com.

Michael Reynolds:

Good stuff there at ABMP.

Allissa Haines:

Yeah, a lot. I went a long time on that, but I hope they're cool with my improvisation. Michael, you're in charge again today of the topic. This is the second week in a row. I can just skate on by. Oh, good. I just want to ... My friend, Michael Moore, who's a massage therapist, who started out in Boston and is now I believe in Southern California, is listening. Hi, Michael.

Michael Reynolds:

Hi Michael. Thanks for stopping by.

Allissa Haines:

Take it away, other Michael.

Michael Reynolds:

All right, sounds good. And as a good point, I'll make a reminder that if you're following on Facebook Live, feel free to post comments and questions down there in the comments box and we'll bring them up at various times throughout the episode if we have any. So all right, today we're talking about social media, everyone's favorite topic sometimes. How to consistently come up with social media content, this seems to be a topic of concern for many of us in the business world in general, but especially among independent massage therapists because we're always looking for ways to reach new people and market our practices. And social media comes up a lot.

Michael Reynolds:

And I've noticed that a lot of us have some anxiety, some issues around getting the ball rolling with social media, staying consistent with social media, how to use it, a lot of stuff around social media. So one of the things that people ask is: Hey, how do I keep up with it? How do I stay consistent? How do I come up with stuff to post? So I'm going to walk through a few ideas today to kind of give you some launch pads and starting points for how you might think about stay consistent on social media and coming up with stuff to post.

Michael Reynolds:

So I'm going to start with this. The first thing I want to do is frame it a little bit differently. And I want to encourage us to think beyond just social media as the content. A lot of us, when we approach using social media to market our massage practices, we go straight to the platform, we go straight to Facebook, or straight to Twitter, or straight to LinkedIn, or TikTok, or whatever it is. And we're like, "Okay, great. How do I put something on there that is useful and interesting and will get me some attention?"

Michael Reynolds:

So I'd like to say before we do that, let's create some fuel to kind of prime that before we go straight to the platform itself. And what I mean by that is, it's a lot easier to generate content and insights on social media when you have something to say first that is thought out in advance in the form of some other form of content, some kind of fuel. Not always, but I find it does help. So one example: Do you maintain a blog? If you do maintain a blog on your website, even if you post articles once a month, which by the way, if you're a member of our Blueprint mastermind community, quick side note, we offer a free blog post once a month you can use and repurpose, so there you go. Go get that if you want to join the community.

Michael Reynolds:

So if you have an article on your website, that automatically gives you something to share. You've got the fuel that you're going to then distribute. So instead of just posting something random, you can share the blog post, and you can then add commentary to it on social media. So if you're going to share the blog post on Facebook, for example, post the link to it, but then put your commentary. Pull a quote out from it, put it in quotes, and then put a comment on, hey, I've noticed this, X, Y, Z, whatever. Add some commentary and that gives you much richer information to post, instead of just putting a sentence or two on there, or a photo, or something, you're sharing a resource. You're linking up the resource. You're offering commentary. It gives you fuel to then distribute and post.

Michael Reynolds:

Videos, it's no secret I think to most of us that the social algorithms really favor video these days, so a video can go a long way. So if you create a video in your practice, even a short two or three minute educational video on stretches people can do at home, or something related to your niche, or something like that, then you can upload that to different networks. And again, the networks like video a lot. They favor it. The algorithm likes to promote videos. And it gives you something, again, you can add commentary to it, post the video, add your own commentary, add some quotes from it in there, some insights. And that gives you some really nice fuel to share.

Michael Reynolds:

Webinars, not many of us are doing webinars in the massage profession, I know. But some are, and if you can do that, even semi consistently, webinars for your community, for your audience, for your clientele, it can be really short, simple things that teach people something about their wellness program. You can then share those on social media, turn those into videos as well.

Michael Reynolds:

We're big fans of podcasting here. That's content as well. Not many massage therapists are running a podcast right now, but it's a great way in my opinion to potentially share the insights you have about wellness and people you serve in audio form. And you can share podcast episodes on social media as they come out. And also, one nice thing is you can link up your podcast to Facebook, for example, and it'll automatically create a little podcast episode in the Facebook feed, so it kind of gives you a little extra bit of content that automatically gets pushed out there. So whatever content you have already created, that's a really good starting point.

Michael Reynolds:

So instead of thinking, oh what do I post on social media and that's it, think "How can I unlock what's in my head? How can I unlock the insights I have for people and things that will help them, and turn that into some form of content that I can then distribute through social media?" And that makes it easier. Before I move on, do you have anything to add there, Allissa? Anything I've missed, or anything you would add?

Allissa Haines:

No, but I really like that concept of unlocking what's in your head. That's going to stick with me a little bit.

Michael Reynolds:

So next, how do you come up with stuff to create content about, whether it's on social media or fuel in the form of content that then gets put on social media? How do you come up with this stuff? I think one of the best ways to do this is to document client conversations, anonymously, obviously. And by document I mean it can be in your head, but you'll probably lose track of it later, so jot it down. After you have a conversation with a client, have little notebook there, jot down ideas like, hey, we talked about this. Question mark, should I maybe turn that into something, or a series of topics?

Michael Reynolds:

So some of the things you might talk about with your clients. What can I do at home to relieve stress between massages? A lot of clients might as that. They might ask things like, "Do you have any neck stretches I can do, or any X, Y, Z stretches I can do for this thing we worked on? How often should I get a massage?" That's an easy one people ask a lot of times. Can massage help fill in the blank? Different clients have different questions about things like, "Hey, can massage help my X, Y, Z, whatever's happening here?" Or just statements they make. They might say things like, "Wow, that really helped my fill in the blank." Great, jot that down. Okay, tell a story around that.

Michael Reynolds:

Telling stories can be a really great way just to, in a non salesy way, share the great work you do that is very quiet and unassuming, but also very confident and valuable. So if a client says, "Hey, that really helped my whatever," my neck pain, or my sciatica, or whatever it is, obviously celebrate that. Write it down. Then think about: Okay, what happened? What did I do? Not super uber specific and technical, but hey, here's what ... I love working with clients with sciatica because the tools in my toolbox include these types of things. And when I see a client come off the table, and I can just see a weight lifted from their shoulders because they can stand up straight and their pain is whatever. You can kind of tell this story and really celebrate the fact that ...

Michael Reynolds:

And center on the client. Don't center on you. Center on the client and their journey and how you helped them, but really center on them. And that makes it not about you, which is I think useful sometimes to not make it about us, but about our clients, and then indirectly tells that story about your role in that particular situation. So obviously, keep it anonymous, but turn those into stories you celebrate on social media.

Michael Reynolds:

And answering questions again is awesome. So clients ask questions all the time. So when they ask a question, turn that into an answer. And the answer can be a quick little post of Facebook, but I would rather the answer be a blog post, or a video, or a podcast episode, or something that goes a little deeper into answering the question in a longer form. And then again, that gives you fuel that you can share on social media with some additional commentary and insights, but that's a much richer experience in the newsfeed than just a quick sentence about what happened. Yeah. Go ahead, Allissa.

Allissa Haines:

So I was talking about telling client stories, but doing it appropriately and anonymously. It would be a bad idea if you saw a client post, let's say reconstructive breast surgery, and you found there were some techniques that you taught them to do at home that were really helping. And I don't suggest that if you see that client on a Monday morning, that then Monday afternoon you post, "I had this great client, and these are the breast reconstructive scar techniques that are really, really helping for them," because your client may have come to you from five other clients who happen to know that person had a massage that morning. So you can make notes on things, and then share a week or two or whatever later, and say, "In my experience with blah, blah, blah, these are the self care techniques that have most helped with blah, blah, blah."

Allissa Haines:

There are ways to do this and keep it appropriate. You can also just always ask your client and say, "I'm actually putting together some resources on self care techniques for people after breast reconstruction." Of course, I'm not going to say I have a specific client who, but is it okay to say ... Are you comfortable saying, if I say, "I have some breast reconstructive clients, and this is some stuff that's been helpful"? Because I know that you have a lot of friends that know you come here. You can do this, if you are concerned, if you're in a really small town and you're concerned about sharing that kind of information. We typically always have more than one client with any particular thing, so we can usually find ways, space it out, don't be posting this directly after that client's in your office, I just had a client who blah, blah, blah. That would be inappropriate. But think through how you can share some of your general help and even some more specific stuff if you do it the right way.

Michael Reynolds:

Yeah. Great points, great points. Use common sense when sharing this stuff, absolutely. All right. So next, I would say get comfortable with visuals. Most social networks are very visual. There are a lot of tools out there that will help you create images out of almost nothing. You can take quotes, phrases, tips, little insights, and turn them into images that can bring them to life. So Canva's a great tool. Allissa, I want to let you know, I'm getting more comfortable with Canva. I hate it less and less all the time.

Allissa Haines:

Wow. They've made a lot of improvements in the past couple years. And they're so big and easy to use now that they're used in school systems. They have an education portal. It's really cool.

Michael Reynolds:

Yeah, so I'm getting more comfortable with Canva. Snappa is one I like, as well. Unsplash has lots of stock photography you can use to kind of put things together. You don't have to always have this blog post to share and fuel behind it. You can also intersperse it with simple quotes and simple tips and simple insights, but putting them on an image, obviously with the text there for accessibility also, but that can go a long way toward kind of spicing up your newsfeed and having some variety.

Michael Reynolds:

So get used to some of these free tools that can really make it easy to make beautiful visuals for your social feed. I'm also a big fan of using trusted resources. Don't forget you have stuff out there. Not everything has to be directly from your head. You don't have to always say, "I have to come up with all the stuff all the time on my own." So ABMP and AMTA are two of the leading organizations for massage. Obviously, we're big fans of ABMP here. They have a resource center in the member center with all sorts of client resources and things to share, and articles you can kind of spring from, and all sorts of tools and things you can use to kind of share.

Michael Reynolds:

So when you're sharing stuff from other sources, reference that source, link to their site, obviously put your own commentary. But that can be a great way to ... It's called curating content, so you're curating other people's content that you trust. AMTA also has ... I did a quick search on their site, and one thing they have is an article called 25 Reasons to Get a Massage. It's a consumer facing article. So they have stuff like that as well. Both organizations have stuff that you can share that is consumer facing, that is useful to kind of speak to the consumer audience in massage. So make use of your professional organization's materials. I would bet that many of us don't even know what's available in professional organizations. So log into their member centers and go to their websites. Find, scour all the information you can find there about stuff you can share and use for social media content as well.

Michael Reynolds:

Also, I'm a big fan of promoting partners in your community. Again, doesn't have to all be about you. If you are plugged into your local community, maybe you have chiropractors you like, acupuncturists you like, attorneys, professionals you like, physicians, people that you network with, people that you refer to, don't be afraid to promote them, to maybe share information they're sharing as well. If they have events, maybe kind of talk about those events. If they have content on their website you want to share, maybe share it and offer your commentary and promote kind of attention on them as well. It also has a side effect of they'll appreciate that in theory, and they might reciprocate. They might also keep you more top of mind as well, so that could potentially be something you can do.

Michael Reynolds:

So I would also say have a system, so in my opinion, it's very difficult to just kind of willy nilly say, "Well, what do I post today? I don't know. This week ... " If we don't have a system and a plan, life just gets away from us, and we don't do it. So I'm a big fan of some kind of system, and it doesn't have to be one size fits all. But what I like personally is one thing I've seen work really well is once a month maybe, schedule an hour every month, or an hour and a half, or however long it might take you, in your calendar, schedule in your calendar. So it's an appointment with yourself, and sit down and go through your next month and schedule out all the content that you want to post.

Michael Reynolds:

There are plenty of free scheduling tools like Buffer and some other stuff out there that'll let you pre schedule social content really easily. And you can kind of schedule it out a month or even a week at a time, whatever works for you, all at one time. And then you're kind of done. And then the content's going out there, and then you can just kind of interact. So then when people comment, or people share things, you can just kind of ... You're lower stress because you're just commenting, replying, and interacting as a person, not worrying about what you're putting out there because the scheduling is already done in advance for you. So I like that, having a system really helps, and again, make sure it's part of your process. Make sure it's in your calendar as an event, or it's on your to do list, or something, where you're going to do it every single month, or every week, or whatever.

Michael Reynolds:

Also, don't be afraid to repeat. I think this trips a lot of people up. We think, "Everything I post has to be a one time thing, this point and time in the universe, and never to be repeated because it's got to be unique every time." No, it doesn't. In fact, it probably shouldn't because we feel like we have to be unique all the time, but social media is a continuous feed. Recycling is fine. People miss stuff. People forget stuff. People need to see things more than once before it sinks in. I think one of the ... Lots of different rules of thumb with advertising, but I've heard anywhere from people have to see a message seven times before they act on it. Or some people say 14 times or whatever.

Michael Reynolds:

The point is seeing something one time doesn't always sink in. So it's perfectly fine to this month, post something, next month, maybe post it again, or post a variation on it, or maybe in three months, recycle it, post it again. So keep a library of stuff, and pull out of your library and recycle things as needed because new people are going to follow your social profiles, new people are going to see stuff. People aren't going to see it the first time around. They're going to forget. It's fine. Don't be afraid to selectively recycle things. Not everything has to be the most unique one time thing you're ever going to post and that's it.

Michael Reynolds:

You also don't need to post every day. I personally think one to two times a week can be fine if that works for you, or once a week even. If your goal on social media is to kind of keep a presence out there, show activity, potentially reach people, you don't have to do it every single day. In fact, it might be too much. So I'm not going to give you like, "Hey, you should do this," because it depends. It's what's right for you is what's important, and your audience. But don't think you have to make it super frequent. You want to focus on quality, not quantity. I would rather see someone post something really thoughtful and interesting once a week than post fluff every day. That's going to be a much better use of your time. So whatever schedule works for you, that's perfectly fine. Don't get hung up on it. Just try to be consistent.

Michael Reynolds:

And take a look and see what's working and what your pace and vibe and schedule looks like, and how that's working with you. So again, be thoughtful, insightful, focus on the quality, not the quantity. So that's what I got, that's kind of a list of thoughts I wanted to share to help people kind of think through how to either jumpstart or get better at posting and coming up with content on social media on a regular basis. I'd love to hear what your thoughts are as well, Allissa.

Allissa Haines:

Yeah. Well, I want to note some of the comments we've gotten, which Crystal noted that they use PicsArt, which is a lot like Canva and those kinds of things. And earlier in the conversation, Michael noted that what I've learned from my clients about life myself today is a question I ask myself regular ... Regularly, pardon me, I'm fumbling that. It's been super helpful for the past 25 years of becoming a better MT and [inaudible 00:27:06]. And I love this comment because it's so true. You know when someone adopts a dog, and they're like, "Where'd you get the dog?" And they're like, "I got it from the rescue. But really, the dog rescued me." That's how I feel about the wisdom that our clients give us just in general. And specifically right down to stock tips that I've heard, that massage therapists have gotten, that have been very effective from whatever, their investor clients, but also just watching how our clients deal with things and handle the situations of their lives that we may or may not hear about.

Allissa Haines:

And I think that is, it's a lot. The stories our clients tell us can be really helpful in one, just making us better humans, but also the way we align our business and accordingly, what we say about it and how we market it. So that's all I have to say there. I wanted to comment on these really great feedback that we're getting.

Michael Reynolds:

Yeah. Thank you.

Allissa Haines:

Yeah. Here's the thing, we've totally done an episode on how you don't have to use social media to run your business, to grow your business. But it can be a really helpful tool, so if you can get over the hump of: What the heck do I post? And how do I do this? It can be really useful and it can even be fun. The thing Michael said to me way back when was, "It's all about relationships." It is, and this is just a tool. Social's a tool for building and maintaining relationships with clients and potential clients and referral partners. So if it's something you use personally and you're fairly fluent in it, then sure, use it for business. And these are some really good tips on what the heck to post. Put some kind of structure around it. It doesn't have to be a hard structure, just some kind of structure around it, some flexible guidelines, and you'll probably do pretty well with it. And that's what I have to say about that.

Michael Reynolds:

Thank you. All right.

Allissa Haines:

Yeah. Who's our next sponsor, Michael?

Michael Reynolds:

Jojoba.

Allissa Haines:

Yay. Thank, Jojoba. We are indeed sponsored by The Original Jojoba Company. I use Jojoba because it's non allergenic, so I can use it on any client and every client without being worried about an allergic reaction. And for my clients with acne, it's especially great because it does not clog pores and make them all gross. In general, I love Jojoba because you don't need very much of it. You can literally two to three drops is enough for an arm. And if you want a little more slip and slide, you use a tiny bit more. If you want more traction to do deeper work, you can absolutely do that with a liquid like Jojoba.

Allissa Haines:

And I know people swear off oils for deep work, but that's probably just because you're using too much. And in fact, Jojoba isn't even an oil. It's a wax ester that is the closest thing you can get to the sebum that our skin naturally produces. Anyway, you my friends can get 20% off the price of the product when you shop through our link, massagebusinessblueprint.com/jojoba. Man, I could do Jojoba ads in my sleep.

Michael Reynolds:

Yes, you could.

Allissa Haines:

I feel really good about that.

Michael Reynolds:

Yes, you could.

Allissa Haines:

The other day, one of our clients was like, "What are you using on me?" I'm like, "This is The Original Jojoba Company."

Michael Reynolds:

The script just flipped on. Didn't it?

Allissa Haines:

I went through my podcast shtick, and they're like, "What are you doing?" I'm like, "They're my podcast sponsors." Anyhow, I'm a super slacker, so I don't have a quick tip. But what's your quick tip, Michael.

Michael Reynolds:

I love that. My quick tip's super cheesy, and our theme today, tell the people in your life that you love them. Don't be afraid to be silly about it. I'm working on ... I think many of us, especially myself, are really bad or just not great at expressing our feelings often to people we love. So I'm trying to get better at that. I'm just trying to get better at in the moment, just telling people how much they're appreciated, how much they're loved, how much they mean to me. And so that's my quick tip, is tell people in your life that you love them, even if you feel silly about it, or if it's uncomfortable because it really makes a difference when people hear those words and those loving thoughts, and thoughts of respect and caring that you have for people. So that's my quick tip for the day.

Allissa Haines:

The worst thing that happens is you make somebody's day.

Michael Reynolds:

Yeah, there you go.

Allissa Haines:

Rock on. So yeah, that is everything that we wanted to cover today. I really appreciate y'all joining us live, Crystal and Michael, or not live, just listening later on. We appreciate you very much. If you have a topic you would like us to cover, reach out, podcast@massagebusinessblueprint.com. And you will absolutely hear back from Michael and/or me. And we love your questions, we love your thoughts, we love your feedback. We love even if you tell us that you hate something we broadcasted, and you are quitting the podcast, which we got one of those yesterday, so yay. And it was because of a conversation that Michael instigated, not me, so I really like that. Leave us a review on Apple Podcasts if you so desire. That helps us. I think we are at this point still the most reviewed massage related podcast on Apple Podcasts.

Michael Reynolds:

Yeah, I think we are.

Allissa Haines:

ABMP might be coming up on us, but I'll beat them down.

Michael Reynolds:

Challenge accepted.

Allissa Haines:

So yeah, tell the world. And again, we talked about this in the last few episodes. We've not been very great at promoting our premium mastermind community for massage therapists who want to have peer mentorship relationships, and also a ton of resources to help you build your business, including massage stock images and posts, blog posts, and graphics you can use on your social media. If you really need help finding content, we can totally help you with that. You can learn more about that at massagebusinessblueprint.com/mastermind. And I think that's all we've got for today. Thank you for joining us. And in the theme of today's episode, we really, really love you and appreciate you. Bye.

Michael Reynolds:

Thanks, everyone. Have a great day.

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