Podcast

Episode 394

Dec 31, 2021

Join Allissa and Michael as they discuss their 2021 words and share their words for 2022.

Listen to "E394: Our 3 Words for 2022" on Spreaker.
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EPISODE 394

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  • Our 3 Words for 2022

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Transcript: 

Sponsor Message: 

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Michael Reynolds:

Hey everyone, welcome to the Massage Business Blueprint Podcast, where we help you attract more clients, make more money, and improve your quality of life. I'm Michael Reynolds.

Allissa Haines:

I'm Allissa Haines.

Michael Reynolds:

We're your hosts, as always. Episode 394, and we are still your hosts.

Allissa Haines:

We are in this, the last and final episode of the year of our Lord, 2021.

Michael Reynolds:

Such finality in that statement. All right. Well, on that note, what you reading?

Allissa Haines:

I'm going to like post the link to a couple of different articles. The caveat here is that they're probably all 90% bull. Because, you know, whatever. I was reading this article the other day, or no, I was reading a thread on Twitter from somebody with ADHD talking about how many hours of productivity can the average person actually get into a day. It was based on an eight hour work day of someone who's a traditional kind of employee and how much time they spend on cigarette breaks and browsing the news and going to get coffee. The finality of this was that the average worker in an office kind of environment gets maybe two hours and 53 minutes of actual productivity work done every day. I got to say that made me feel so much better.

Allissa Haines:

I feel like I have no frame of, I haven't been in a traditional office. Well, I've never really worked in an office, but when I worked in pharmacy, it was just nonstop. You just went, went, went, went, went, and I haven't worked in any kind of traditional job or been employed in 15-plus years now. I feel like my frame of reference for what I should be accomplishing work wise is just all over the place. I don't know. That particular article kind of sent me down a rabbit hole and I ended up reading something that was actually written by a few brain scientists that were like, "Yeah, you can't expect more than three hours of real work from your brain on any given day."

Allissa Haines:

It just made me feel a lot better to have like a more realistic productivity goal and not even a goal, but just an idea of really what I can do, because I really have found that sweet spot is between two and three hours of actual thinking work. I can snag another four hours of admin and miscellaneous task right on top of that and that's fine, but I'm hitting the wall between two and three hours of things that truly need my attention and thought and intellect. Yeah, there's that, which is really good because I think it's going to help me set some better routines as I move forward, which will be relevant to my three words, which we will discuss in a minute.

Michael Reynolds:

Have you seen the 90s movie Office Space?

Allissa Haines:

Yeah.

Michael Reynolds:

I always go back to that. It's like on any given day I say I do about 15 minutes of real actual work. So many things about that movie are just such criticisms on life in general. It's just, it's so great.

Allissa Haines:

You and I have advocated for a long time like to kind of reconsider what you think of as work and we don't often have or make enough time to do creative thinking and discovery.

Michael Reynolds:

Yeah.

Allissa Haines:

That's a big deal, like sitting and thinking about what I want my three words for next year to be is work. Doing some note taking and just some creative thinking and envision, I hate the word I'm sorry, but envisioning is really, really important. It is work. It is thinking work and we need to assign a little more value to it I think.

Michael Reynolds:

I'm glad you mentioned that because I'm sorry, we're kind of in a slight tangent here, but what looks like work and what actually is work is a really important thing to keep in mind because often our families as business owners don't understand and what work looks like. I still find myself sometimes, I'm working on this, but I still find myself feeling guilty if Ariana is in the house and sees me staring at a document or something or just sitting there kind of thinking and not typing at a keyboard, but like processing things or doing something that doesn't really look like work or going for a walk and thinking about something. I'm like, "oh, do I seem like I'm just not working all day?" I feel this guilt that I shouldn't be feeling, but we're so trained to think that work looks like doing something with your hands or in a meeting or doing something that's very businessy. That's great to remember that work is not always what we think it should look like, but it's still valuable.

Allissa Haines:

I have had really, quite the learning experience living with Walt because he's a scientist, but he's research and development. I would always be like, you spent an hour and a half in your office this morning and then you went out and worked on your sailboat and he'd be like, "Yeah, I'm in the discovery period. I read a whole bunch of like things about whatever chemical we're trying to test for but I just needed to take a break from it and then I went out and sanded my boat for an hour and I came up with this idea of something, something." He does that a lot. He's really good about like knowing when he hits the wall on active thinking and then doing something else, something else that's easy and routine. Then his brain just gets to go crazy and be creative. Your best ideas come in the shower. Anyhow, yeah, we really do need to put more value on that. You've taught me a lot about that, as has Walt, and it's been really helpful. Anyhow, lots of tangents.

Michael Reynolds:

Yeah.

Allissa Haines:

Who's our first sponsor?

Michael Reynolds:

Our first sponsor is us. Hey, look at that. It's us.

Allissa Haines:

Yay. Do you want to do this? Do you want me to do it?

Michael Reynolds:

I'll start and then you'll make it better.

Allissa Haines:

Go for it.

Michael Reynolds:

We are going to give a shout out to our downloadable guide called How to Get New Clients. I actually had occasion, I just referenced this yesterday. I was working with a client on a website, someone in our community that we built a website for, by the way we build websites FYI for our community members in the Blueprint Mastermind Group. She was like, "Hey, okay. I'm launching my new website. I'm kind of getting back into practice here. What do you think are the best ways to market?" I'm like, "Well, let me tell you." I give her some advice. I also said, "Hey, we have this great downloadable guide that is a comprehensive overview of all the possible options you might consider that we've seen work well for massage therapists. It is free and you can get it at massagebusinessblueprint.com/getnewclients."

Michael Reynolds:

Allissa put this together and it's been kind of revamped to be just gorgeous, beautiful design. Our team member Reanne just made it look amazing. It's a really great, it's like 14 pages. I think it's really short, but it's a very nice, actionable overview of where you might start to just get new massage clients to expand and add to your marketing efforts. You can get that, again, online. It's free at massagebusinessblueprint.com/getnewclients. If you're feeling stuck when it comes to marketing, stuck when it comes to getting new clients, this I think will help get you unstuck.

Allissa Haines:

Yep. If you went to this link before had trouble downloading it, we fixed the busted link so definitely go there and try it again. I'm sorry if you had trouble, but as all of my great work evolves, so did this one, which is, I got annoyed by people giving wrong answers on the internet. We see the question a lot in a lot of different places online. Like how do I get clients? We created this guide as an answer to that because you'll have one person swear up and down that Groupon is the best option and it's not for everyone. You'll have someone else swear up and down that Facebook Advertising is the best and it might be, but not for everyone. We went through all of the things in a linear way. Here's what you need first. Here's what you definitely need second. Then, here are your options based on the kind of things you prefer to do and your skill sets. Yeah, I'm really happy with it. Definitely go to massagebusinessblueprint.com/getnewclients.

Michael Reynolds:

All right, go get it. Discussion time. What are we going to, oh, I know what we're talking about. It's the end of the year. Our three words.

Allissa Haines:

Yay. Why don't you tell us, because I skip this part every year, because I just listened to a whole bunch of our previous three words episodes. Why don't you tell us what the three words protocol experience is?

Michael Reynolds:

All right. I will do my best. Allissa and I have been doing this for many years now. There is an author, business consultant, speaker that we follow called Chris, named Chris Brogan. We've kind of followed him for a while. I think we've both had kind of personal interactions with him, taking some of his courses or his webinars. He's a really interesting guy. I really like his mindset on business. Again, he writes books, does speaking, does consulting, and he came up with an exercise called the three words exercise. The concept of it is this every year it seems like there's this tradition with many people of doing new year's resolutions and setting goals. I'm not knocking those things. They can work well for some, but for many people, I'm one of those people, very tangible, specific resolutions or goals or things sometimes can be counterproductive. They are very binary. They're like, hey pass or fail, like you did this thing or you didn't. Often there's judgment laced around it. It can just be very counterproductive sometimes.

Michael Reynolds:

Chris and his partner Rob at Owner Media, they have come up with this system called the three words exercise and it is instead of setting resolutions, it is defining three words for the year that are your themes for the year. It's a theme that kind of aligns your energy in a certain direction. It's meant to be very fluid. It's not meant to be binary pass fail. It's meant to be more forgiving and more supportive. I've really enjoyed it. Allissa and I both really enjoy it and we've done this every year. For me anyway, it's been extremely helpful in just kind of keeping me focused on this theme or set of themes that's important for me for growth in that given year. I'm not sure if I said that very well, but I'm sure you'll say it better. What did I miss?

Allissa Haines:

I think you did a good job there. I think you really, yeah, no, good job.

Michael Reynolds:

There it is.

Allissa Haines:

Nicely done.

Michael Reynolds:

Thanks. All right. Do you want to go first or would you like me to?

Allissa Haines:

I'll go first.

Michael Reynolds:

Okay.

Allissa Haines:

I just have to bring up my thing. Okay. Yeah, so we usually mention what our previous years three words were and how we did on them.

Michael Reynolds:

Oh, right.

Allissa Haines:

Right. I know. Are you prepped for this? I actually went and looked at our podcast transcript from this episode last year, to make sure that I was like, "Okay, this is what I stated my goals to be. Did I actually meet them?" One of the things I actually did in preparation, I went through when I was able to go as far back as 2015 and find all of my three words, which was really neat. Some things that popped up a couple years in a row and some that kind of disappeared and came back. I'm going to post on our Instagram my list of what my three words have been historically through 2015.

Allissa Haines:

For 2021, both of us were alliterative. I chose patience, pace, and purview. Patience was pretty self explanatory in that I wanted to be more patient in my interactions with children and people and partners and the world at large that I find extremely frustrating and I feel like I've done okay. I've actually definitely calmed my potentially volatile reactions to things that were annoying or difficult or whatever. I'm good. I feel good on patience. Pace was all about a work routine that served me best and made me feel most motivated and invigorated instead of exhausted all the time. I give myself like a C-plus on that. I have definitely found a routine that works for me. I'm struggling with like the ritual of sticking to it and not getting distracted by, oh, I got to do a load of laundry instead of writing this blog post or whatever, but I'm getting there. I feel like I made good progress.

Allissa Haines:

Purview, which was really interesting for me, in that it was about staying in my lane and it was about staying in my lane in regards to how quick I can be to offer help to people or to take on someone else's problem and make it mine to solve. It was also about rethinking and reminding myself of when I need to have authority over any given situation or when I need to not and step back, especially in regards to step parenting. I feel like I did pretty good with purview. There are definitely a lot of things that I have pushed off my plate this year and things where I just take a deep breath and I say, "I can not care about out this thing more than the person who was actually in charge of it. I'm going to let it go."

Allissa Haines:

I'll say our friend Reanne, I was venting something to her at one point. She was like, "I understand all your concerns. Of course you want what's best for this kid, but is this within your purview? Does this align with your goals for the year?" I was like, "Oh, thank you. Thank you." That's really good. I feel good about how my 2021 words went in the context of the ever flowing crap show that is our global situation. Okay. Words-

Michael Reynolds:

I will say, sorry, can I pop in? I will say I have noticed change in patience. All three, definitely, but I've definitely noticed change in the direction I think you want it to be in, in the form of patience. I've observed that.

Allissa Haines:

Yeah, I definitely feel, and I'll expand on this in a second, less volatile. I feel less volatile and that's like really good for me. Okay. 2022. Okay. It's almost like I have four words, but I don't. I actually started with one word and that word was build, and I was like, I have a trilogy going along with the word build. As I was working through what that was, I realized it was mass alliteration and there's three factors to my build concept. First, I would like to build my businesses back and it's going to involve making decisions about what kind of work I want to do and how much of it I want to do in any given week. My massage practice is very much part-time right now. I've realized how weird and sometimes good and sometimes bad it has been to go from someone who had 18 to 20 clients a week to someone who's seeing 8 or 9, sometimes 10 or 11 clients week.

Allissa Haines:

I wanted to do more and I started to do more. Then I had a shoulder thing crop up and that really kept me mindful of my pace, I'll tell you that. Having to adjust my schedule to accommodate that as I was healing was a big deal about. I realized I have not spent any, nevermind enough, but I haven't spent any time working on building a side business that I really want to do. I want to make some websites and get people started on their small business marketing. I have not put any attention into that. Building my businesses in a way that strikes a balance, as far as the amount of work I want to be doing in any particular venue, that is something I need to work on.

Allissa Haines:

The second facet of build I have referenced is my body. I had a lot of healing to do this year, I had like physical therapy, retention headaches, and [inaudible 00:17:34] biceps tendonitis that popped up. I think I'm past the acute issues, but I need to definitely do some strength training and regular exercising because I am not getting younger. I want to be able to do massage work for at least another 10 years. I want to be able to do thinking and computer work for another 10 to 15 years without having pain or dysfunction because of that. I need to build my body up. Also, along with that has come this idea of like I want to take care of my body better, but I also want to enjoy things that I have never enjoyed before. I don't wear perfume, but one of the things I started doing last year was buying a better quality soap and also more environmentally conscious shampoo and conditioner bars instead of liquids and plastic bottles and a facial cleanser and a moisturizer.

Allissa Haines:

I have very much enjoyed using a higher quality product and buying from a local maker. I have a personal care section of my budget now, so that I don't have to feel bad about buying a $9 bar of soap. I don't do it all the time, but I really like it when I do. I got a little essential oil perfume roller from this same company. On the days I don't work, I wear a little bit of this scented, this essentially perfume. I really like it and it's so silly, but it's like, it's a luxury for me and it's different. I like it. I lost my train of thought onto something else I was going to say with that, but I guess I will just let that go. Anyhow, it's awesome. That's my body.

Allissa Haines:

The final thing is to build up my brain. There's two parts to this kind of, part of my less volatility is that I have started a program of neurofeedback, which is kind of exercise for your brain, gets your brain waves balanced in a way that can help you restore full focus or relaxation or whatever. Don't everybody email me and be like that didn't pass a double blind, blah, blah, blah. I don't want to hear it. I did the legwork. I talked to people who've done it. I'm doing this neuro feedback thing, which I can do at home through an app. It's very much helping me. It's noticeably helping me first with my ability to maintain patience and flow. Now we're working on the focus aspect and that's really helping.

Allissa Haines:

Also, part of my brain, I am aware that what is lacking in my life is more nourishing connections and relationships with my friends. It's been a hard couple of years for friendships, but I wasn't really great at maintaining friendships before this whole thing. Yeah, I'm working work on like kind of building up the loving parts of my brain and working again on maintaining better connections with my friends. Those are my words. They all are based under build, but it's body, brain, business.

Michael Reynolds:

I really like that.

Allissa Haines:

Thank you. It was a long tangent. Sorry.

Michael Reynolds:

No, it's great. Build was one of my words in the past as well. I have a special place in my heart for the word build.

Allissa Haines:

You know how much we love alliteration.

Michael Reynolds:

Yeah. I'm kind of jealous. I didn't do alliteration this year. I'm jealous that you got to do it two years in a row. That's nice. Well done.

Allissa Haines:

Not for nothing but this idea, this all came to me while I was folding laundry. Yay for mindless creative time.

Michael Reynolds:

It works. Yeah.

Allissa Haines:

Tell me about your stuff, Michael.

Michael Reynolds:

All right. So my 2021 words have been strong, simple, and space, also alliteration. Strong was a little bit multifaceted. It was to remind me to keep focusing on strengthening my body, which I've been doing. I think that's, out of all the three words, that's the one I've done the best on. I've consistently done, my mostly consistently done my three days a week weightlifting routine. I've got an app that kind of guides me through the training and gradually increasing the weights and kind of following the plan. I've been really enjoying that. I've become someone who works out three days a week and I don't overextend myself. I don't like work out crazy hours or every day. I just kind of have a nice, simple pace that works for me. I've noticed change in my body I really like. The tone and definition of my body is kind of going the direction I want. It's been happy or I've been happy with it. Then strong also applies to just mental strength and just kind of resilience in general in my life. I feel like I've been doing well there. I'm happy with that.

Michael Reynolds:

Then simple, I have a bias towards simplicity, but I don't always do a great job at implementing it. I think I've done pretty well at that as well. I've been launching a new business over the last couple of years, my financial advisory firm, after going independent, that's been ... There's a always a temptation with new businesses to over complicate it. I've done a pretty good job of simplifying and I've actually been, I've ended up teaching other financial advisors how to simplify their business as well because we all make this too complicated in this particular industry. I've done a pretty good job of simplifying systems, processes, business kind of structures and policies. Been doing pretty good job there.

Michael Reynolds:

Space, I feel like I utterly failed at, I shouldn't say utterly, but mostly failed at. I've been trying to make sure I create enough space for things that are important, working less, setting boundaries with my time, things like that. I ended up saying yes to a lot of stuff and didn't really purge stuff from my schedule like I wanted to. Space I'm still working on. Actually, fun fact, I actually emailed Chris and Rob, Chris Brogan and Rob Hatch from Owner Media separately and was like, "Hey, I'm thinking of just carrying over these same three words for the next year. Is that cheating? Because I feel like I still have work to do."

Michael Reynolds:

They both independently wrote back and said, at different times saying, "It's your framework to follow. But what I find is if you use the same words, they don't carry the same impact." They recommended using similar words that were different, but still kind of meant the same thing. I got some advice on that and kind of thought back and forth and realized, yeah, I think I need to push myself and create new ones for this year. That was the thought process I went through. With that, my 2022 words are, first one is deep. I think Alyssa you've either used deep or deepened before. Right?

Allissa Haines:

I used depth in 2020 because I wanted to like-

Michael Reynolds:

Depth. Okay.

Allissa Haines:

Yes, yes.

Michael Reynolds:

Yeah. I chose deep and that is because I feel like I have done a great job of putting things in motion. I either own or co-own four businesses. I don't plan to start anymore. I'm really holding myself to that and I've done some pivots on some businesses. I've done some optimization on some others and some evolutions. I feel like these things are pointed in a really good direction and it's time to go deeper, especially in my financial advisory business. I feel like I'm just really loving, I'm getting some new credentials and certifications and doing just tons of continuing education and really going deep and the more I uncover in this industry, the more depth I see that is possible to dig into. There are so many areas of specialization. There are so many different ways to approach helping people with their financial journey.

Michael Reynolds:

I'm just really, I'm looking into a certified financial therapist program that I'm going to take next year to kind of go deeper into the psychological behavior, therapeutic side of money and relating to money. Going really deep has just been really fun for me and I want to continue that. That's that word.

Michael Reynolds:

Level is my next word. Level is to continue the momentum I feel like I have gained in this previous year and that really applies to, in one way, just my psychological ability to remain level. I guess my emotional ability to remain level, I think. Kind of like you, Allissa I have some volatility, like I'm very emotional about things. I get fired up about stuff. I get antsy about stuff. I'm sometimes hypersensitive to things like my emotions take over more than I would like sometimes. Over the past year or two, I've done some work with a therapist, I've really kind of focused on just observing better how I react to things. I've done some reading and some just learning about how to handle emotions. I feel like I have gotten much more level about how I handle my emotions. I've got plenty of work to do, but I feel like I've come a long way.

Michael Reynolds:

I want to continue that momentum and remind myself that it's important to me to have a sense of being able to level my emotions and to sometimes detach from things that I don't need to let affect me the way they have affected me in the past. Maintaining that level of emotional control has been really important and helpful to me. That's word number two.

Michael Reynolds:

Word number three is fortify. This goes along with my effort to increase emotional and general life resilience, both in the businesses I'm involved in, just life in general. Being able to fortify the work I've done and add additional levels of resilience has been really helpful to me. As a side note, it's also kind of a reaction to the fact that unreliable people in situations and unreliable situations just drive me crazy. I'm realizing I can't control what other people do. I can't control how reliable other people are. But I can control how resilient I am in the face of things that frustrate me. The word fortify is just kind of my visualization of the resilience and the work fortifying that I want or the work I want to do fortifying the elements of my life that are important to me. Business, personal life, that's kind of where fortify fits in. Those are my words.

Allissa Haines:

I love it.

Michael Reynolds:

Thanks.

Allissa Haines:

It's going to be, hopefully, a not terrible year, man.

Michael Reynolds:

I love your optimism. Hopefully not terrible. Yeah.

Allissa Haines:

Just cautiously optimistic. I don't know.

Michael Reynolds:

Yeah, yeah. Right on.

Allissa Haines:

Yeah. We want to hear your three words. If you want to share them with us, I would totally dig that. I love hearing from you. You can email us at podcast@massagebusinessblueprint.com if you're a Blueprint Mastermind member of our premium private community, I'm going to put a post up about this soon kind of exploring, inviting everyone to explore and share their three words. I would love to hear how you're doing. How'd you do on last year, if you did this exercise, how you feel about the exercise, and what your words are for 2022.

Michael Reynolds:

Love it.

Allissa Haines:

What's next, Michael?

Michael Reynolds:

All right. What's next? Wow. I feel like we've just gone really deep into lots of this stuff and I got to kind of shake it off now.

Allissa Haines:

I know it was soulful.

Michael Reynolds:

Yes.

Allissa Haines:

We're Soul Sunday over here.

Michael Reynolds:

You know what will clear us out here? A good old fashioned Jojoba.

Allissa Haines:

Woo, yay Jojoba you know that I love Jojoba for a whole bunch of reasons. It's non-allergenic so you're not going to hurt anybody who's got an allergy to any particular thing or cause hives, you're not going to cause pimples because it's non-comedogenic it won't clog pores. What I also want to talk about today, and I've mentioned it before, but I'm mentioning it again, is that the Jojoba company has a fantastic website with a really cool blog. There's a bunch of blog posts, especially for massage practitioners. There's one about using Jojoba for salt stone massage. It's got some stuff for aromatherapy and it's got some interviews with how certain practitioners are using Jojoba in their office. You can also like how to use Jojoba on your pets and how to infuse it with [inaudible 00:30:17] and how to do all of these very cool things. I would encourage you to check out that website. Also, our listeners can get 20% off the price of Jojoba using our link, massagebusinessblueprint.com/jojoba. It's J-O-J-O-B-A.

Michael Reynolds:

Thanks. Joba. All right.

Allissa Haines:

Thanks, Jojoba. Yeah, you were first.

Michael Reynolds:

All right. This apparently has been around since mid 2020, but I just now discovered it and heard about it. You can record the pronunciation of your name on LinkedIn. I think this is super useful because sometimes if I'm meeting with someone for the first time over Zoom or something, and I've only corresponded with someone via email and they have a name that I don't know how to pronounce I feel very awkward. I give it a try and I'm like, "Hey, did I pronounce your name correctly?" And there's this whole thing. Usually it's fine, but it would be super useful to go to someone's LinkedIn profile and click a button and hear them say their name so I know how to pronounce it. I think it's great for everyone to do this. Now, I'm not sure if I'm going to do it. My name's pretty vanilla, but you know people that speak different languages or come from different backgrounds may not find it as vanilla as I think it is so probably good for me to do too.

Michael Reynolds:

Anyway, I think it's really useful to record your pronunciation and let people hear it. It would kind of cut down on the guesswork. That's a really cool feature I discovered on LinkedIn. There's a link in the show notes to an article with instructions on how to do that.

Allissa Haines:

As someone who has been called everything from Melissa to Alicia to Allison to Alisa, I can endorse this and will probably be doing that.

Michael Reynolds:

Right on.

Allissa Haines:

People who don't care about the pronunciation of your name, probably not going to listen to it anyway.

Michael Reynolds:

Maybe. I care darn it.

Allissa Haines:

At least people, it's going to be obvious who does care. That's nice. My quick tip is a little bit of like a shout out. Thank you. Love note, whatever, to my dear friend, Jason, who was also a massage therapist and at various points in our, and who by the way I met on Twitter, like my friend from Twitter, who I became real life friends with to the point where he has employed me to work in his business, because he is in a tourist destination in the Summers where I have gone and been able to stay and have lots of thinking and reading and writing time and also work part-time and let me stay in his home and with whom I exchange Christmas presents annually.

Allissa Haines:

He knocked it out of the park this year. He sent me this mug. I'll have to put like the link to the mug in there. He sent me a mug that you push a little button on the bottom and you can choose the temperature at which it will keep your beverage warm. I can keep it to a 135, 140, or 145 degrees Fahrenheit. It lasts for a couple hours on its own, just the mug itself. If you put it on its like battery charging base, it will keep your drink warm for as long as you keep it on the base or until the battery charges again, you can take it off the base. I have had it for like a week or so, and it is a game changer. I love this mug.

Allissa Haines:

I like that it also doesn't keep it warm after like two hours or three hours, because at that point I'm like, "If you haven't had your coffee, now you're not going to finish it. Just pitch it and start again with something else. But it's just the most thoughtful gift that has dramatically changed the quality of every morning. My quick tip is to consider a fun gift you can give someone or give yourself that improves some aspect in the quality of one's day. For me, I really, I don't drink a ton of coffee. I have about a cup, maybe sometimes two cups in the morning, but I like coffee. I like starting my day with a ritual of a hot beverage. I am incredibly fortunate that we have a coffee pot that I can program at night. Just knowing that the coffee is ready for me in the morning inspires me to get out of bed and which is especially hard right now because it's so dark in the mornings. This mug that keeps my coffee at a stable temperature for two hours. Thank you, Jason. Thank you.

Michael Reynolds:

Wow. I want this mug now too.

Allissa Haines:

It's freaking awesome. I'll find the link.

Michael Reynolds:

Send me a link to it. Yeah.

Allissa Haines:

I will do that.

Michael Reynolds:

All right.

Allissa Haines:

It was just such a thoughtful gift and that's it. I'm all about improving the quality of my day in little ways. That's it. Thank you.

Michael Reynolds:

All right. Very cool.

Allissa Haines:

Thank you, Jason.

Michael Reynolds:

All right. Well, hey, we're closing out the year. Thanks everyone for being a listener today and throughout the year. If you've been with us for a while, if you're new, hey, welcome aboard. We hope to see you in 2022. With that, you can find us online at massagebusinessblueprint.com. You can email us at podcast@massagebusinessblueprint.com. Let me also take this last opportunity of the year to say if you're not a member of Blueprint Mastermind, which is our super smart, private community of massage therapists with lots of resources and peer support, hey, maybe this is the year for you to join. Check that out on our website. Thanks to everyone for joining us today. Have a great day. We'll see you next time and next year.

Allissa Haines:

Bye.

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