Podcast

Episode 352

Apr 30, 2021

Michael and Allissa go over the benefits of how to use a Solo 401(k) in your massage business.

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EPISODE 352

Weekly Roundup


Discussion Topic

  • Using a Solo 401(k) in Your Massage Practice


Quick Tips

Sponsors


Transcript: 


Sponsor message: 

ABMP is proud to sponsor the Massage Business Blueprint Podcast. CE courses you'll love are available for purchase or included for free with your membership in the ABMP education center abmp.com/CE. Explore hands-on techniques, complete ethics requirements and discover trending courses like a detailed approach to low back pain from Alison Denny. All ABMP memberships include 200 plus video based on-demand CE classes. And if you're not a member, you can purchase access for single courses or CE packages abmp.com/CE. Want more from ABMP? Check out the ABMP podcast available abmp.com/podcasts or wherever you prefer to listen. Expect more with ABMP.

Allissa Haines:

Hello everyone. Welcome to the Massage Business Blueprint Podcast, where we help you attract more clients, make more money, improve your quality of life. I am Allissa Haines.

Michael Reynolds:

And I'm Michael Reynolds.

Allissa Haines:

And we are your hosts and we so appreciate you joining us today. Michael, what are you reading?

Michael Reynolds:

Well before we get to that, I want to say, happy friendiversary Allissa. On the day of our recordings, which is today, which is April 28th, Facebook notified me that it's our 11 year friendiversary from the day we became friends on Facebook. So happy friendiversary Allissa.

Allissa Haines:

Thank you, Michael. I hadn't seen that. I haven't spent much time at Facebook this morning.

Michael Reynolds:

And good for you for not spending much time on Facebook.

Allissa Haines:

I spent just a little bit of time, I read one thing. But well, happy friendiversary right back at you. Look where it got us. And everyone, since Michael brought it up, I'll tell you the story. Michael was doing some work for the Massachusetts chapter AMTA for which I was a volunteer and I wrote one of my very first blog posts for what became the blueprint here. And he sent me an email that said, you're brilliant. I still have the email saved by the way. I think I might've printed it out at one point. And then several months later, we actually met in person at an AMTA convention and spent the first two hours that we actually met talking about how we were going to overthrow the massage world. And here we are 11 years later.

Michael Reynolds:

And I have to say that 11 years later you're even more brilliant than you were then.

Allissa Haines:

And you've been more patient with me than I ever thought anyone could be. Okay. So now that we've got that out of the way. Sorry Meg, about that banter. Meg doesn't like our banter. Michael, what have you been reading?

Michael Reynolds:

Well, Meg, here's what we're reading. I have become obsessed with COVID stats. I don't think it's an unhealthy obsession, I think it's just a desire to be super informed. So anyway, I'll go with this. And I subscribe to this email newsletter called FS Insight from a company called Fund Stray. And I apologize, this is not a public thing. I actually pay a subscription to get this newsletter. It's mainly a financial newsletter. It's got a lot of financial analysis and economic analysis and global stuff. Anyway, but they have a really, really, really in-depth COVID stat tracker section of the newsletter, where they have just like mountains of data on all this stuff, which I really enjoy. I really like to pour through the data. And so I've been reading, kind of following what they've been talking about recently, which is that the US seems to be, according to their data anyway, seems to be tracking Israel's path.

Michael Reynolds:

And Israel has reached basically zero COVID cases. I mean, it's like probably a handful, but it's basically, in comparison, it's almost zero because their vaccine rollout has been so successful and so well-managed. And so once they hit over 40% of vaccine penetration in the country they started to really see a massive drop-off in cases. And like I said, it's basically down to zero and the US is now at 42% vaccination rate and starting to see the same similar downward trend. So I found that encouraging that if all goes well, I'm hopeful that we're following Israel's trend of seeing a severe drop-off and return to normalcy. Hopefully, I've been saying, hopefully by this summer. No one knows, I know anything could change, there's lots of variables. But I like to see the encouraging statistics. So that's what I've been reading.

Allissa Haines:

Well, that is nice and positive information. I appreciate that.

Michael Reynolds:

Yeah.

Allissa Haines:

So my reading is the polar opposite of Michael's fact-based numbers insight. Because I found an article from Oprah Daily, the 50 Most Anticipated Romance Novels of 2021 to Renew Your Faith in Love. And I put the link in the show notes. If you click on it, like if you click on it on desktop it gives you a slide show which is super annoying, but I found on my mobile, it actually just lets me scroll the page. So I actually started at the bottom of the list, at the very end, and I scrolled up and I saved like the first 10 books to my Boston Public Library, like virtual Kindle subscription. So I saved the first bunch of them. So I have a stack of just light, but well-regarded, romance novels to read.

Allissa Haines:

Which is good because I stopped reading for a while again. I was like doing a lot of scrolling on my phone which is not particularly healthy. So I have started actually just reading fiction from my Kindle again in the morning with my cup of coffee and at night before I go to bed, and I am ever so much healthier for it. So yeah, 50 Most Anticipated Romance Novels of 2021 people.

Michael Reynolds:

Nice.

Allissa Haines:

Yeah.

Michael Reynolds:

I love the yin and the yang we have going on there.

Allissa Haines:

Yeah, right. Like I feel good about our diversity.

Michael Reynolds:

Something for everybody.

Allissa Haines:

It really is. Michael who's our first ad sponsor?

Michael Reynolds:

Our friends at Acuity.

Allissa Haines:

Thanks, Acuity. They're the scheduling assistant that makes it easy for traditional businesses to become virtual, if you want to. And it works behind the scenes to fill your calendar 24/7. Acuity is the business suite that takes hours of work off your plate for realsies. No more playing phone tag, and it gives you the freedom to focus on all the other important aspects of your business. You, my friends, can get a 45 day free offer when you sign up today and you can check that out massagebusinessblueprint.com/acuity.

Michael Reynolds:

And I'll just say that I've been going back to getting a monthly massage now and every time I go online to book a massage, my massage therapist uses Acuity and it is such a pleasant experience. I just love it so much. It's so easy. It just makes it so much fun to book a massage. Because getting a massage is fun anyway, but Acuity makes it even more fun. So from the client experience, it is awesome.

Allissa Haines:

I should probably put that in my talking points because that is like the number one positive thing about Acuity is that it is so simple and easy on the user end. Like, my clients love it. You can have your settings so that people do not have to log in in order to schedule. It's just like three clicks and they're done and it's very, very nice.

Michael Reynolds:

Yeah.

Allissa Haines:

Okay, so Michael's in charge of our topic today, which means I can just take a break and mute myself. So Michael, what are we talking about?

Michael Reynolds:

Enjoy. I'll warn you if you need to unmute. So let me find my notes. There we go. So today we're going to talk about using a solo 401(k) in your massage practice. We've alluded to this before. We've talked about it a little bit. But I realized we've never done a specific episode just unpacking and talking about what the solo 401(k) is. So we're going to talk a little bit about that today and why it might be worth considering your massage practice as a retirement plan.

Michael Reynolds:

So the vast majority of our community, as far as I can tell, is solo massage practices, maybe a handful of people, but generally they're the solo practitioners. And so we're in that solo-preneur category, which is a buzzword I hate. But actually I don't hate it, I kind of like it, I'll admit it. So we're in the solo business owner kind of world. And so we don't have a lot of the same options as people with like a quote, regular job, have. Like a 401(k), like a lot of people have 401(k)s at work. Individually, we can use other types of plans, but they have some limitations.

Michael Reynolds:

So here are the options for retirement plans for solo business owners. You've got the traditional and the Roth IRA. Those are the core easy things to start with. The traditional IRA lets you save pre-tax money into a retirement account. It grows tax deferred. So it gives you a tax break upfront. A Roth IRA lets you put in money after tax, which has already been taxed, but then it grows tax-free. So they have opposite ways of handling taxes, but that's a really common type of retirement vehicle. There's the Simple IRA, which is, I'm not going to get into too much because it's more applicable to multi person teams. The SEP, the Simplified Employee Pension, which is pretty common to solo business owners. There's the taxable brokerage account, which is just a general account to dump money into and invest, and there's no tax sheltering at all. And then the solo 401(k), which we're going to talk about.

Michael Reynolds:

So let's talk about first, the other things and the limitations on those types of accounts before we get to the solo 401(k). So the limitations on some of these accounts are that they have no Roth options. So here's why like Roth a lot. Roth is kind of a label you put on a retirement account that signifies that the money inside of it is growing tax-free. You put money in the account after it's been taxed and you don't get a tax deduction on it, but any of the growth is going to be tax-free. So when you take that out later at retirement, there is no taxes being charged or being applied to that money. It's all completely tax-free money.

Michael Reynolds:

So it's really advantageous for a lot of people. There are always individual factors to think about, so I'm not going to say like it's a one size fits all perfect thing for everybody. But for a lot of people, it makes a lot of sense to say, hey, I'd like to let my money grow over 10 or 20 years or so or more, and then when I withdraw that a retirement, I've got so much more spendable income because it's Roth money. It's tax-free money I'm withdrawing. So the SEP and the simple plans have no Roth options. So the simple plan, again, we're not really going to pay much attention to because that's really not applicable to a massage therapist. But the SEP is really common. A lot of accountants will encourage you to use a SEP. Accountants love the SEP because it lets you put in more money than you would normally be able to put into an IRA, and it gives you a tax deduction upfront. And accountants are really focused on saving you taxes now, which is good, that's their job. And so they really go straight to the SEP a lot of times.

Michael Reynolds:

So if your tax person is telling you to set up a SEP, it's probably because they want to lower your tax bill right now. But be aware that whatever money is growing inside of that SEP is taxable at retirement. So when you withdraw that money and start using it later at retirement, all that money is going to be taxed at your tax rate at that time. So not the end of the world, but if you can avoid being taxed later on with all that growth, that would be nice. So that's the limitation of SEP. Some limitations of IRAs, there's low contribution limits. So if you're younger than 50, you can put up to $6,000 into an IRA or Roth IRA. If you're older than 50, you can put in up to 7,000.

Michael Reynolds:

So it's still kind of a limit. So it sounds like it's a lot, but some people want to put in more. Maybe they want to catch up or maybe they have a desire to accelerate and they want to put in more than that. So with an IRA you are limited to six to $7,000 per year, which is no, I mean, honestly, it's not that much. I mean, if you're going to be catching up or you want to save more, that can really cause an issue when you're trying to save more into tax advantage accounts. Also, IRAs and Roth IRAs have income imposed limitations. So with a Roth IRA, for example, you can not contribute directly if your household income is above a certain amount. If you're individual, it's in the 125 range per year. If it's joint, married filing jointly, it's in the $200,000 range.

Michael Reynolds:

So if you are in a household, and by household I mean either individually or joint filing, if your household income exceeds those limits you are not able to contribute directly to a Roth IRA. Now you can do what's called a backdoor Roth, but there's also other weird rules that come into play. So if you have money in a traditional IRA you can't do a backdoor Roth to get around it. And there's all kinds of complicated rules that come into play. So just, I'll simplify it by saying, once your income reaches a certain limit, you have issues and challenges and limitations with using IRAs.

Michael Reynolds:

The taxable account we've talked about a little bit in the past before, is a great option, but there's no tax savings on it. There's no tax sheltering. So taxable account is basically just saying, you know what, forget it, I'm not going to use any retirement account. I'm just going to investment account that just lets me dump money into. There's no limitations on income or amount to put in, but you're putting money that's already been taxed into it, and then you're going to be taxed on the growth as well.

Michael Reynolds:

So you have that issue of being taxed. It's not the end of the world, but the purpose of retirement accounts is the tax sheltering. And the advantage of those retirement accounts is the tax breaks you get on them. So we're left with considering the solo 401(k), which a lot of people don't know about. It's not super common. It's still like a weird thing people don't always know about. They know about a regular 401(k) at work and they think, oh yeah, I've had a previous job or my partner or people I know have this 401(k) at work because they work at a big company and it's a normal thing we know about.

Michael Reynolds:

But as a solo business owner, you are able potentially to set up what's called a solo 401(k). which is basically what it sounds like. It's a miniature 401(k) plan that is just for you and your solo business. So here's what's cool about a solo 401(k). It has a Roth option. Or, it typically does. Depending on where you open it, it usually will have a Roth option. So what that means is you can bypass the limitations of Roth IRAs, or income limits, and you can put money into a Roth account without worrying about any of those issues. You can put up to $19,500 per year, under 50, and $25,000 over 50, if you're over age 50. So you've got a really high limit. So this comes into play where, again, if your household income is on the higher side and there are other things in place that are keeping you from doing a backdoor Roth. There's other kinds of complex things that I'm not going to get into, but there's just stuff that comes up.

Michael Reynolds:

You can have a free, clear way to put a lot of money into a Roth account with your solo 401(k). On top of that, it also has a pre-tax side of it. So it's similar to the SEP in that you can put pretax money into it, which gives you a tax deduction upfront. So accountants like this as well, because you have the option of saying, well, let me put some into my pre-tax and my Roth because then I'll have my tax break that my accountant wants to help me with, and then I can also put Roth money in for that tax-free growth later on, which will be nice. So it has those two options. And you can put up to a total of $58,000 per year into it with the stipulation, that is, it can't be more than 25% of the net income of your business.

Michael Reynolds:

So I won't, there's all sorts of little complicated details and what ifs, I'm not going to get to those. But just be aware that if you meet the requirements, you can put a lot of money into it. So again, no income limitations, no issues with getting around backdoor Roths and stuff like that. You can also take a loan against the plan, if your plan allows it. Most plans will allow this depending on where you set it up. I'm not saying I recommend this necessarily, but it is an option that's there if you need it. You can take a loan against your solo 401(k) and then pay it back to yourself over time. Which in certain cases can be better than other types of loans. Again, I'm not encouraging it, but it's a feature.

Michael Reynolds:

It's pretty easy to set up and administer. I've seen them set up in about three days before, depending on who you go with. You've got flexible investment options. You can put pretty much whatever you want to inside of it, similar to an IRA. And again, those tax benefits are, you've got dual tax benefits. You can put money into the pretax side to lower your tax bill and the Roth side to enjoy tax-free growth.

Michael Reynolds:

So who is eligible for a solo 401(k)? You have to be a business owner with no full-time employees. And full-time is defined as no more than working 1000 hours per year. So if you are employing, actually, I think this is lowering to 500 hours pretty soon. So it's going to be cut in half pretty quickly. So I think as of 2021, it's still 1000, but we're going to see it drop to 500 hours per year.

Michael Reynolds:

So time employees, or no employees that work a lot in your business. You can have some occasional part-time help, but as long as they stay under that hour limit they won't count as a full-time employee. So you've got to be a solo business owner, no full-time employees. A 1099 contractor is eligible. So we've, Allissa and I have both ranted about 1099 versus employee over and over until we're blue in the face. So think back to those episodes and you'll realize that if you are a 1099 contractor, you are not an employee, you are technically operating your own business. Which means you are eligible for a solo 401(k). So that's the good news there. Partnerships are also okay. So if you have a partnership, partnerships are eligible. You both count as business owners in a solo context. You're both solo business owners with no full-time employees and you can each have a solo 401(k).

Michael Reynolds:

Also, a spouse can be a full-time employee and not count against you. So for example, let's say I have a massage practice and my spouse or partner works full-time in the business as well as an employee. They will not count against you as in your eligibility requirements. You can still have a solo 401(k) and employ your spouse full-time. So that's a nice little loophole that is a feature of a solo 401(k).

Michael Reynolds:

So a couple of deadlines to think about. There are a few more rules on solo 401(k). So with IRAs you have up until your tax deadline to activate and fund an IRA. With a solo 401(k), it's a little more of a gray area. There are different rules, which we're not going to get super deep into, but be aware that in general, to be really clean and safe by it, you want to get things set up and done by December 31st. You want to have your plan activated by December 31st and funded by December 31st of that year.

Michael Reynolds:

Now, with COVID legislation happening right now, those rules have been relaxed. For example, I set up a 401(k) for someone, or a solo 401(k) for someone, recently that was in April and because of the recent changes in legislation and the relaxed deadlines on things they were able to fund it after the fact. But normally for a lot of businesses you want to make sure it's December 31st. Now, if you're an LLC or a sole proprietorship, which is most of us, that deadline is relaxed a bit. You can wait until closer, up to the tax deadline of the following year to fund the previous year. So we're getting into territory where it's good to talk to somebody, an advisor or a tax specialist, about this. So I'll leave it at that.

Michael Reynolds:

So I'll recap by saying, I really am a big fan of the solo 401(k) plan for solo massage therapists, because a lot of us do want to save more than that. Let's say you're under 50 and you want to save more than that $6,000 per year limit. The solo 401(k) gives you a nice extra bucket to plug money into. So maybe you want to save seven or eight or $9,000 in a year. Maybe your business is going great and you're able to catch up a little bit and you want to have that extra tax advantage account to plug money into. A solo 401(k) can be really great for that. It's also nice to have the dual purpose, the pre-tax and post-tax. So in some years if you want to lower your taxable income while paying yourself and investing in yourself for retirement the pre-tax side can be advantageous.

Michael Reynolds:

And then the Roth side of course is great for growth. And then for some of us, let's say your household income is on the higher side. Then you run into some issues with contributing and the solo 401(k) let's you sidestep those issues and just directly contribute to Roth accounts and tax advantage accounts without worrying about income limitations. So I'm a really big fan of it. I think it's a great tool and I know a lot of massage therapists that have these set up, and make use of them every year for tax savings and tax free growth and extra buckets of money to put money into you for retirement. So I know it's a little bit of complex subject. I tried to make it as simple as possible, but I'm sure some of it is clear as mud. So Allissa, if you want to tell me, maybe add on, go for it. What do you think?

Allissa Haines:

Yeah. So I have a solo 401(k), and once it gets set up by your financial advisor, preferably, preferably for me because I can't do these kinds of things to myself, it's super easy to just make a transfer from my checking account to the 401(k). And I actually do it every other week. I've been trying, I set some goals for each month. And what I do is I contribute to the traditional portion up to the point where I have a conversation with my tax preparer and say, listen, tax-wise, what do I want to be putting into the traditional portion? And what do I want to be putting into the Roth portion for the remainder of the year? Excuse me. And I do that so that I get some tax benefits from it to put me in a good tax bracket, so my taxes don't get out of control and such. And also frankly, so that I'm eligible for health insurance on my state exchange at a decent price.

Allissa Haines:

And then once I know my income is going to fall within a certain range I put what is appropriate into the Roth portion, so that I have some pre-tax and some post tax. And that varies what will happen in my retirement a little bit as far as taxation. And that works really well for me. And once it's set up, it's not hard. And even to get it set up, it's not hard, but it's just paying a bill every month. Just like I pay every other bill, only this bill I get to see the balance in my retirement accounts just rise and rise and rise and that makes me feel super bad-ass. It really does. It is the retirement vehicle that I use for my business and it works really well for me. And that's what I have to say about solo 401(k)s. And I know that a lot of our listeners and members have started their own retirement accounts at Michael's urging and feel similarly bad-ass about it. It's a very adulting move I feel like, and I feel good about it. So yeah, co-signed, Michael, co-signed.

Michael Reynolds:

Awesome. Awesome. And then cost-wise, one thing I wanted to mention is it can range from free to a few hundred dollars to get set up. So I use TD Ameritrade for my solo 401(k)s and it's free to set up with TD Ameritrade. It's a pretty vanilla plan. It works for pretty much everybody. You can spend a little more and get what's called third-party administrator, sorry. I got tongue tied for a moment. And they will allow you to do additional things.

Michael Reynolds:

Like for example, you can do fancy things like in-service withdrawals and after-tax, mega Roth stuff and all sorts of fancy things. Which I've never yet run into a small business owner that needs that stuff, but in some cases you should basically expect to pay either anywhere from zero to maybe four or $500 to set up initially. And then the annual fee is anywhere from zero to about a hundred dollars a year. So just be aware that depending on where you open it up and what features you have, you might be in that range of free to not very much, not terribly expensive. So just be aware of those costs.

Allissa Haines:

Excellent.

Michael Reynolds:

Yeah. Right on.

Allissa Haines:

Well, thank you for that, Michael. I think that wraps it up. And do you want to tell us who our next sponsor is?

Michael Reynolds:

Jojoba.

Allissa Haines:

Hey Jojoba. This episode is indeed sponsored by the original Jojoba company. I believe massage therapist should only be using the highest quality products because our clients deserve it, and because we're soaking it in for several hours a week and we deserve it. I love Jojoba but because it does not go rancid. There's no triglycerides, so it won't go bad. And this also makes Jojoba a wonderful carrier for essential oils because you can throw a few drops of that very expensive and high quality essential oil into eight ounces of Jojoba and not worry that it's going to get all gross in six months. It is non-allergenic so I can safely use it on any client and every client without being worried about an allergic reaction.

Allissa Haines:

And you, our listeners, can get 20% off the price of the product when you shop through our link, massagebusinessblueprint.com/jojoba. That's J-O-J-O-B-A. And I will tell you that Jojoba has started doing a little bit more with the email marketing and they even had a buy one get one half off special last month. So if you missed that and are sad, then you should totally go to massagebusinessblueprint.com/jojoba. Sorry, I lost that. And sign up for their email list. It's all over their website so you won't have a problem finding it. Thanks Jojoba.

Allissa Haines:

All right. So Michael, what's your quick tip this week?

Michael Reynolds:

Yeah. So my quick tip is, I encourage you to look into a tool called SaneBox. I think I've mentioned this before. I maybe made a quick tip before, but I don't care cause it's awesome. I'm going to do it again. So I love SaneBox so much. It is an email tool. It costs money. It is not free, but it is fairly inexpensive. And what it does is it lets you have all sorts of fancy tools for your email. And here's how I use it. So it gives you folders called, like every folder they label is called Sane something because it's branded, but it's called like Sane later, Sane next week, Sane next month, Sane reminders. Like all these little folders that you can use, and it's got tools you can use as well to bounce messages on your radar and off your radar as needed.

Michael Reynolds:

So first of all, it intelligently learns what email is important and what is not important, or at least not immediately important. And it filters the important stuff in your inbox and it filters the less important stuff into a folder called Sane later. And then when you get a chance, maybe once a week or so, you can go in that Sane later folder, you can see what's in there and deal with stuff that's less important. So it kind of is a nice way of keeping important stuff on your radar in real time. It also has like a Sane news folder where all your newsletters get dumped and you can just filter through those on your own time. What I use most of all is the reminders feature. So here's the the case study. So how often do you email someone and you just know in your gut there's a 50% chance they're just not going to get back to you, and you want to be sure you follow up on it.

Michael Reynolds:

Well, how do you keep track of that? Do you make a note? Do you whatever, do you try to remember? So what I do is you can email, you can blind carbon copy your SaneBox email address. You can say like oneweek@sanebox.com. And then you can delete, you can forget about it. And then a week later it will pop that message thread back into your inbox to remind you that you emailed that person and give you the whole thread. And then you can reply all to it, to follow up, and keep track of stuff that you want to get out of your inbox but you want to be prompted for later on. You can also snooze emails. You can take emails, you can say, okay, snooze it for a week and drag it into your Sane next week folder. So I'm going to snooze five emails.

Michael Reynolds:

They'll pop back into my inbox next Monday, but they get out of my inbox view for the short term so I can have a clear view of what's going on. So the snooze feature is really nice too. There's a bunch of other types of folders you can activate, but those are the ones I use most. And I got to say, I couldn't live without it. It's an awesome tool for email. I know a lot of us hate email, but SaneBox makes me kind of love email again. So I'm no shame about putting my referral link up there. Allissa, if you have referral link, you can replace it with yours, but I have a referral link up there so I get a little bit of credit, I think you do too.

Allissa Haines:

I don't use SaneBox.

Michael Reynolds:

Okay. So if you want to use SaneBox and you want to give me a little credit there, you're welcome to use my referral link or just go to sanebox.com. And that's my quick tip.

Allissa Haines:

Thank you, Michael. I know you love it.

Michael Reynolds:

I love it.

Allissa Haines:

I tried it and it just wasn't, it didn't quite work for me. And also I'm ridonculously cheap.

Michael Reynolds:

It's not for everybody.

Allissa Haines:

No, but I see very clearly how efficiently it works for you, and it makes it so that it's hard for us to drop too many balls. My quick tip is how to leave a review. So I have been just blindly at the end of many episodes, being like, leave us a review on Spotify or Google Play or Apple Podcasts, or wherever you listen to us. And not knowing that, hey, turns out you can't leave podcast reviews on Spotify. And I read very quickly last night that also with Google Play, you can't do that. And also on Apple Podcasts, it's a pain to leave reviews. So here's the quick tip for how to leave a review on Apple Podcasts, should you choose.

Allissa Haines:

You can't do it just from your regular podcast feed. You actually have to go click on the little search magnifying glass, type in the name of the podcast, and then choose that podcast as if you were searching for it. And then scroll to where it says ratings and reviews and click on, see all, and then it will say, do you want to leave a review? So, I am sorry that is such a pain in the rear to leave a review for us. And if you don't, I understand. But if you have Apple Podcasts and it's easy enough for you to do, please feel free to leave us a review and that will help other people find us. And I would like to send a special shout out to our listener, Michelle, who pointed this all out to me and was like, hey, I tried for 20 minutes to do this and couldn't figure out how.

Allissa Haines:

And it turns out that I wasted 20 minutes of her life. So I'm sorry. And thank you for taking the extra few minutes to email me about it. I really appreciate that.

Michael Reynolds:

Right on.

Allissa Haines:

All right. So we covered the review bit. If you have a question that you would like for us to answer on the podcast, you can email that to us at podcast@massagebusinessblueprint.com. And we would love to hear your questions and maybe answer them on a podcast episode. Tell your friends, your massage friends, or whoever. I don't care who you tell, tell your grandmother, if we help you and help them subscribe to the podcast so they can listen as well. That is all I have to say. Michael, did I miss anything?

Michael Reynolds:

Nope. I think we're good.

Allissa Haines:

All right, everybody have a super productive, wonderful day and get your solo 401(k) set up.

Michael Reynolds:

Thanks everyone. Bye.

Allissa Haines:

Bye.


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