Podcast

Episode 350

Apr 23, 2021

Michael and Allissa go over the simple steps you can take to make a networking group work for you.

Listen to "E350: How to Make the Most Out of Your Networking Group" on Spreaker.
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EPISODE 350

Weekly Roundup

Discussion Topic

  • How to Make the Most Out of Your Networking Group

Quick Tips

  • Use a freaking password manager
  • Help someone get vaccinated

Sponsors


Transcript: 

Sponsor message:

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Allissa Haines:

Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Massage Business Blueprint podcast, where we help you attract more clients, make more money, improve your quality of life. My name is Allissa Haines.

Michael Reynolds:

My name is Michael Reynolds.

Allissa Haines:

And we are your hosts. Thank you as always for being with us. Michael, what are you reading this week?

Michael Reynolds:

I am listening this week.

Allissa Haines:

Okay.

Michael Reynolds:

I have a podcast I wanted to share that I have stumbled across, and it's by a friend of mine. So this is a friend local to my area who I haven't hung with recently, but he's a friend from business networking circles I've known for a long time. His name is Robby Slaughter, and he has launched a podcast that I'm in love with. I think he's got a hundred episodes now, and it is called, Simply Inspiration. And here's what I love about it. It's three minutes long, technically it shows it's four minutes long because you get the intro and outro music, but really it's a three-minute podcast, every day during weekday, so five days a week. And in every podcast episode he tells a story in about three minutes, and they are historical stories and just event based stories from stuff that's happened, and each one gives you an inspirational little lesson, and they're delightful. They're absolutely delightful.

Michael Reynolds:

And I think everyone should go listen to this podcast because it is, like I said, it's inspirational. It's delightful. It's three minutes long. So you can knock them out during any quick downtime thing. And the podcast, again, is called Simply Inspiration. And the website is simplyinspiration.me, if you want to go get links to all of the different podcast sources you can subscribe. So, that's what I'm listening to this week. I think everyone should check it out.

Allissa Haines:

Well, that's really nice. I'm sorry, I was trying to subscribe to [crosstalk 00:02:44].

Michael Reynolds:

You were probably muted.

Allissa Haines:

I know, well, I was, but also I was subscribing to it while you were talking. So I knew you were going to end, but I couldn't get to the button faster. So, that's as it is. So I have been reading an email from a listener, and let me just preface it with this. I knew when I did the episode that was like, can you refuse clients who choose not to vaccinate? I knew that I was going to stir up a can of worms there, and probably get more emails about that episode that I have about many others, which is true. I think I've gotten some feedback from that, which is fine. I did get a really great email from a listener and I did not get permission to share her name, so I will not do that. But who said, you made a comment in that podcast episode, and this is a person who chooses to not vaccinate for a variety of reasons, and took a little bit of umbrage appropriately so when I said something to the effect of people who don't get vaccinated are tending to be reckless in other ways.

Allissa Haines:

And it was a lousy thing to say in the context that I said it, and because in my head I meant, people who are not getting vaccinated because they believe in conspiracy theories and such are often the same people who think that masks don't work, and are, well, really are not that polarized and of conspiracy theories and beliefs that are not rooted in science or reality. And this wonderful, gentle listener made a point to say, you know what? Now you know someone who does not become vaccinated, and I also don't drink alcohol, and I don't get involved with crowds or parties. And I have not been to a single family event or gathering since March, of 2020. I wear a mask with the best seal I can get. And I am doing all of the things I should be doing as a responsible human being.

Allissa Haines:

So just so you know, not all non, she refers to herself as a non-vaxxer. So not all non-vaxxers are reckless dopes. Those are my words, not hers. And it's a really good point. I really shouldn't have made that reference that anti-vaxxers are all reckless. And again, I did in the episode after that, I did dive a little bit deeper into vaccine hesitancy, and I very much appreciate the kind and gentle reeducation from this listener. And this is a polarizing issue in a lot of ways, with a lot of different personalities and belief systems, and I still stand by my episode because I think I got some really important points across, but, of course, there's always more context and color. And I appreciate when readers and listeners send me their thoughts and their perspectives. And thank you very much for that listener. And I hope you haven't abandoned ship. That is what I have to say about that. I had to bring my [crosstalk 00:05:49].

Michael Reynolds:

Thanks for sharing that.

Allissa Haines:

Yeah. It's interesting to me when people send us super hostile feedback and they include things like, I know Allissa is going to rant about this or whatever. That really bothers me in a lot of ways, because if you've listened to a couple of hundred episodes that we've put out, you'll find that the ranting is the smallest percentage of what I do, and is also usually dosed with some humor and self depreciation, self-deprecation, pardon me. And when I get really thoughtful and kind, and Hey, listen, I see where you are coming from, but this is another perspective, and it's not laced with the Allissa is such a bitch thing, I really appreciate that. So I just want to make note, and I really do appreciate people's perspectives. Anyhow, there is Allissa's rant about being misrepresented in media, in her own media that she creates. So our first sponsor, Michael, you tell us who it is.

Michael Reynolds:

Sorry. I was over putting the E on the spreadsheet so we know that's explicit.

Allissa Haines:

Sorry.

Michael Reynolds:

No, no, that's why it's there. Hey, I thought I'd flip it today and invite you to announce our sponsor. Would you like to?

Allissa Haines:

I would. And we'd like to give an extra special thank you to Jojoba.

Michael Reynolds:

There you go. That's what I'm looking for.

Allissa Haines:

Because Jojoba does not go rancid. It does not contain any triglycerides, like many products do. So it won't go bad. A friend of mine actually said the other day, does anyone else have the problem where they over order as if they're never going to be able to order things again, because I've now got four gallons of Jojoba, and I don't know that my career's going to last long enough to use it all. And yes, I also have two full gallons of Jojoba, but it's okay, because it's never going to go. What else did I want to tell you about Joba? The original Jojoba company is the only company in the world that carries 100% pure first press quality Jojoba. It's non-allergenic so you can use it on any client and every single client without worrying about a reaction. You my friends can get 20% off the price of the product when you shop through our link, massagebusinessblueprint.com/jojoba.

Michael Reynolds:

Yay. Thanks Joba.

Allissa Haines:

Yay. And now Michael is handling our topic today. So take it away.

Michael Reynolds:

All right, I'll take it away. So today we're going to talk about how to make the most out of your networking group. So many of us are getting back to networking either virtually, or some of us are in-person. Networking is becoming a thing again for many of us as we're opening up. And I thought it would be great timing to discuss networking, and specifically networking groups. I'm going to tailor this more specifically to formal networking groups, not just out and about random networking, but like a BNI chapter, or something similar, where it's really a referral marketing group. I should really say referral marketing. I use networking because it's the universal accepted, excuse me, understandable term, but really formal groups that meet on a regular basis like this, are technically called referral marketing groups. I'm going to address those types of groups, again, similar to a BNI chapter, or the lots of other types of groups that are similar to BNI chapters because it's the standard.

Michael Reynolds:

So let's say you are thinking of joining a group. You are checking it out. Maybe you're in one already. Maybe you're in the early stages of figuring it out. That's the phase you're in and you're thinking, okay, what's the deal? How do I make this work for me? Is it worth it? So how to make the most of it. First off, number one, give it a chance. I see so many people attend a couple of meetings, have a BNI chapter, or a networking group of some kind, and they just say, well, this doesn't really feel like it's for me, I'm out. And they just don't go back. And they attend maybe two or three meetings, and that's all they do. So first of all, you have to visit more than once when you're choosing. So visit a couple of times, usually they'll let you visit a couple of times, check things out. While you're there, this sounds really dumb and obvious to say, but talk to people, actually talk to people.

Michael Reynolds:

So many people I see they show up and they sit in the corner. Maybe they say hi, but they don't really talk to anybody. They just listen. And that's fine. I know some of us are introverts and that's fine. But if you make an effort to talk to people, you're going to get to know the people that are there, and you might find some delightful people that are friendly, and fun, and might compliment well in a referral context for you. You might also find that you don't like the people there, and maybe they're not a good fit for you. And that's also something you can discover by talking to people.

Michael Reynolds:

So if you're going to visit a group to check it out, talk to people as much as possible, get to know them, ask questions, dig a little deeper. Next. Let's say you're joining a group. You're in it. You're checking it out and giving it a try. Show up and make it as important as a client appointment. Again, saying these things out loud sounds really obvious, but in practice, many of us are bad at this. Many of us are not great at treating referral marketing groups, or networking groups, as important as a client appointment. And when we don't do that, what happens is, let's say your meeting is every Wednesday at noon, I'm speaking of time. So if your meeting is every Wednesday at noon, and you think of it as a less important thing, then when a client emails you, or calls and says, Hey, I really need to get in this week. Can you do noon on Wednesday?

Michael Reynolds:

And you're like, oh, it's a client paying me money. And suddenly your calendar is moved over to the client. And that feels normal, but if you're going to invest time and money into a marketing tool, like a networking group, you need to really use it. And I really advise treating your networking appointment every week, or whatever it is, as important as a client appointment. It's on your calendar. You can't schedule things during that time. You wouldn't bump another client for a client appointment. So don't bump this, make it important. Show up every time, because if you show up consistently every time, then people will start to get to know you better. They will trust you more, and they are more likely to refer you. So that's what really makes it work, is showing up in person and getting to know people, keeps you top of mind, keeps you on their radar, helps them know you better and trust you. And that's what leads to referrals. That's what really makes it work.

Michael Reynolds:

Next, make it a priority to refer other people. I've talked about this many times in the past. So I'll bring it up again. When you are in a networking group, or a referral marketing group like this, it's not about you. It's not about what can you get from the group, it's about what can you do for other people in the group? You want to make it a priority to refer other people as much as possible, make an effort, think throughout the week of, Hey, how can I refer the attorney in my group to someone? How can I refer the CPA? How can I refer the financial advisor? How can I refer the dentist? Whatever it might be, think of them top of mind and make your number one priority in the group, referring other people, because guess what happens? When you do that they refer to you. So, that's really important. That's the number one priority, is to help other people in the group.

Michael Reynolds:

Next, use the services of other people in your group. This is not going to be appropriate for everybody, obviously if you're not buying a house you're not going to use the realtor and the mortgage agent. You shouldn't make up a reason for that, that's ridiculous, but let's say you've already got a dentist you're going to, and the group has a dentist, unless you love your dentist and have some super loyalty, maybe consider switching. So you have that loyalty to the person in your group that you want to help. And maybe if you are working with another service provider, and someone in your group provides the same service, and there's not an extreme loyalty there, consider adding their services or switching.

Michael Reynolds:

If you're not using a service in general, and someone's in your group and you're like, maybe I'll get around to it someday, go ahead and take the plunge and work with that accountant, or work with that financial advisor, or have that person paint your house if you were going to get around to it someday anyway. Make an effort to use the services of people in your group, because that helps you get better at referring them. If you know their work, if you trust them, you can give a firsthand sincere endorsement of their work because you've worked with them. That's a really powerful way to refer other people, which goes back to the previous point of referring other people. So try to make an effort to work with as many people in your group as possible, obviously without forcing it.

Michael Reynolds:

Next, have one-to-ones. One-to-ones are simply just quick 30 to 45 minutes meetings with people in the group outside of the group meeting time. So you just sit down for coffee, or a Zoom call, or a phone call, or whatever it might be, and just schedule some time to chat, get to know each other. Tell me about your business. Let me tell you about my business. Let's dig deeper into who you serve, and what you do, and what makes you great, and take notes. And learn more about the people in your group so that you can get better at referring them. And they'll get better referring you as well, because they'll learn more about you. So I make it a point to, I never actually reached this goal, but I think it's a good goal to shoot for that every, on an annual basis, you should have a one-to-one with everybody in your networking group at least once a year. So throughout the year, make sure that you're going through and checking off. Okay. Have I met with somebody in the past year? And if not, let's meet with them.

Michael Reynolds:

Next, teach the group how to refer to you. This is both in your general 60 second presentations we all do, and your spotlight presentation. Most groups have a go around the room and tell us a quick one minute thing about what's going on with you. And then there's usually a member who's speaking that week, and who's giving a presentation. Teach them how to refer to you. Don't just share facts about your profession. A lot of people they'll stand up and say, okay, I'm a massage therapist. And here's how I work on the muscles, and here's all the stuff. Here's where I went to school, and all this stuff. And they get really deep into the craft of what you do, which is interesting, and that's something you should probably do at some point, or maybe early on, but ultimately you want to teach people how to refer to you. That's why they're there.

Michael Reynolds:

So instead of just talking about, oh, here's what I do, talk about, okay, if you're out and about, or you're talking to a client and you're listening for things like, Hey, listen for people in your network, or your circle of friends that have back pain, or listen for people that have migraines, or who do you know that plays this kind of sport. Think of things that can trigger thought responses in people that help them identify opportunities to refer to you. That's giving them the tools to refer to you. So help them as if you're training a sales person. So obviously as massage therapists we're not going to hire a salesperson, but imagine that your networking group is a whole team of salespeople for you. And so you're training them to listen for opportunities to make referrals. That's the thought process there.

Michael Reynolds:

And be specific, be really specific about what you want. Some of us are generalists. Some of us are niched and specialized. So if you're a generalist, you can still give people specific things like, Hey, I love helping people with tennis elbow. I love helping people relax because they have a stressful job. I love helping people that just had a baby, stuff like that. Be specific and give people something to listen for and understand what makes a good referral for you. And if your niche that's even better. Hey, tell me who's a tennis player? Give me all your tennis player. That's easy, but really be specific.

Michael Reynolds:

Next, become a leader. One of the best ways to get visible and earn trust is to volunteer in your group. So if there's elections, or rotations coming up for the group president, or vice-president, or treasurer, volunteer, be in one of those positions. If there's something that you think would help the group that you can make up a position for, volunteer for that, or make it up. If you want to be the one that designs the business card holder for the group, create something cool for that, or if you want to put a LinkedIn or Facebook group together for the group, or whatever, make that. Do something that puts you in a leadership position, and that helps you earn a lot of trust and credibility in the group as well, which, again, leads to more referrals.

Michael Reynolds:

Next, invite guests. One of the best things for referral marketing groups like this is to invite people and help it grow. So don't just show up and do your thing, invite people in your network. So if you have clients that are in professions that are not represented in your group, invite them, have them come along with you and be a guest, and really encourage people to check it out. That helps the group grow, helps you get more referrals, because then you've got somebody who potentially can join and systematize the referral making to you, and just helps the group get better and helps other people. So it all comes around.

Michael Reynolds:

Last on my list is give it time. This is a big one. So many people get frustrated. Like a lot of marketing techniques, time is the biggest factor. The stuff that doesn't take a lot of time is the stuff that's expensive. You can run Facebook ads, or other sponsored ads, and you can spend a lot of money up front and you'll get quicker results. But the stuff that takes time is the stuff that is a lot more valuable a lot of ways, I think a lot more sustainable. So things like building up your network, and earning trust for referrals, that takes a lot of time. So at least a year. BNI recommends that you're not going to get your first referral until at least a year into the chapter. And that's true of groups that are similar of any kind really.

Michael Reynolds:

So don't give up too early. It might take you about a year before you even see a referral, or at least seeing referrals on a regular basis. That takes a year of showing up every time, within reason obviously, as much as you can make, so show up every time, refer to other people, make that a priority, have one-to-ones with people to get to know them, be specific and give people the tools to refer to you. Step up and be a leader, help the group grow by inviting a guest. A year of doing all that stuff is what really leads to the traction you get after a while.

Michael Reynolds:

This all sounds like a lot, but when you think about it, it's really not. And most groups don't cost that much, it might be anywhere from free to a few hundred dollars a year, which is not that much for marketing investment. And the time spent is probably one to two hours a week of time spent. And when you add that all up for the returns you can get, it's really not that much to invest when it comes to time and money in a really powerful tool, like a referral marketing group like this, because they really can pay off longterm, and can be super sustainable. I hope that was a helpful list of things to help you get the most out of your networking group. If I've left anything out, or Allissa has any comments, I would love to hear.

Allissa Haines:

Yeah. And I think you're being really conservative in the, it might take you a year to get your first referral, because I do think that for the bulk of people we know, massage therapists we know, who are active in their groups, they get a lot of referrals much faster than that, but I like having reasonable expectations too.

Michael Reynolds:

Yeah. That's really why I... yeah.

Allissa Haines:

And it depends on the size of the group, and the size of your community, and the specialty that you have, and all of that. No, I think this is really great. And I think it's a lot more doable than people realize, if I could do it, you could do it. And I did, I was part of a small networking group for about a year and a half. They weren't really an active enough group for me. So I was happy with my decision to back off of that. But I'm on the fence about looking for a new group in the new area my office is in, because I'm waiting for things to level out a little bit, so I see if I even have real space for new patients or not. But this was a really great review. And I want to let people know too, we have a whole multi-part, I don't know how many segments of it, audio course on in-person networking groups that Michael created, that's really easy to work through, it's an audio course you listen.

Allissa Haines:

And it's in our Massage Business Blueprint premium community, premium members get our courses at no charge. And if you want to learn more about that, you can go to massagebusinessblueprint.com, and click on the community button and learn all about our premium membership. I'm so sorry, side note about that.

Michael Reynolds:

Yeah. Yeah.

Allissa Haines:

We have a few courses, but yeah. This is so doable. Even if the only step you can take this year is making one visit to two or three different groups to see what they're like, that's a win. Okay. We'll give you a couple more months to think about which group you want to join. Any step you can take in increasing your marketing and your, pardon me, your networking acumen is a really good step.

Michael Reynolds:

Yeah. Thanks.

Allissa Haines:

Anything else we need to say about that, Michael?

Michael Reynolds:

I don't think so. I always love feedback. So if you have questions, or find yourself struggling with networking, send us a note, podcast@massagebusinessblueprint.com.

Allissa Haines:

And let's give some love to our next sponsor, ABMP. Yay. They've got CE courses you will love available for purchase, are included free with membership in the ABMP Education Center. Super easy to find at abmp.com/ce. You can explore hands-on techniques, complete ethics requirements, discover trending courses like addressing health disparities in communities of color with wellness approaches, with Dr. Nicola Finley. They have a new series of CE socials. It is, I lost my place, I got so excited about the CE socials. Here we go.

Michael Reynolds:

It's very exciting.

Allissa Haines:

It is very exciting, because we're doing one next week. I'm so happy, on Wednesday, April 28th we've got one. You can connect and engage with your massage community experts in the fields like me and Michael, and ABMP as well as you learn and earn CE. You can join us, ABMP, us and them, I guess, live in a virtual classroom to interact with course instructors and learn valuable lieu tools for your practice. These interactive experiences are free for ABMP members, and $15 for non-members, which is pretty good for a CE credit. And your registration includes live event access, your CE, ongoing access to the course, and the ABMP Education Center. And you can go to abmp.com/ce-socials to learn more about that. And you can go to abmp.com to learn about all of their stuff, and their insurance offerings, and their podcast, and their blog, and their magazine, which the digital version is free and available to everyone in the world. And we have a really good column and the most current one. So good job us.

Michael Reynolds:

No ABMP is great, but can I expect more?

Allissa Haines:

You can totally expect more from ABMP. And there's even a little line for that, but I don't know where it is now, because I've got five different versions of the ad in front of me.

Michael Reynolds:

We love ABMP so much. They're good people.

Allissa Haines:

We really do. Abmp.com, and check them out. Michael, got any quick tips for us?

Michael Reynolds:

Oh, I do have a quick tip. I'm going to phrase this very intentionally. My quick tip today is use a freaking password manager, please. I am begging you. A little bit of a rant today [crosstalk 00:25:16].

Allissa Haines:

Of all things business use a password manager.

Michael Reynolds:

Use a freaking password manager. Okay. I'm saying this because it's just bugging me, I'm going to be honest. So I work with a lot of massage therapists who have tech questions, and website questions, and just stuff in general about tech and digital things. And without fail, no one knows their passwords for stuff, like, Hey, let's log into your website admin portal. Let's log into your email marketing thing. Let's log into this, and so we can take a look together. And it's always, oh, well I wrote it down somewhere. I forgot what it was. Let me help find my spreadsheet. There are great password manager tools out there. My favorite is called LastPass, Allissa and I both use LastPass. There is a free version. There is a $2 a month version, which I think is a good one that it's so inexpensive.

Michael Reynolds:

And a password manager sits in your browser, and is a mobile app as well, and it lets you store all of your passwords in one place. It encrypts it, it's really secure. And when you're logging into a site, you can just pull down the little drop-downs and it'll auto-populate your passwords. It'll let you keep track of those. If you change your password on a site, it will detect it and update it for you. It keeps your passwords in sync. And so I get it. We all have a thousand passwords to keep track of, and writing them down on paper is very insecure, unreliable. Putting them in a spreadsheet is very unreliable and insecure. One, they can get out of date very quickly because when you change them you're not going to update your spreadsheet most likely. And spreadsheets are just not very secure by default, they're in plain text.

Michael Reynolds:

So there's so many reasons not to do it that way. Just please, if you do nothing else today from this podcast episode, go to lastpass.com, and sign up for an account, and start putting your passwords in there because it will make your life and mine so much easier. Please use a freaking password manager.

Allissa Haines:

Yes.

Michael Reynolds:

That's my rant.

Allissa Haines:

Yeah, the free version of LastPass, It does enough of what you need it to do. There are some features it doesn't have, and that's okay. I actually just upgraded to a paid plan a couple of months ago. And then I actually did the family plan. So I hooked Walt into it, he had started to use it as well, and now we're hooked into a family plan, which makes it much easier to share the household account stuff, and then also share the kids e-learning stuff this year to have, Liam has his own now so that I can help him with all those middle school passwords, and it's easy for me too, on any computer to be able to log into his school stuff and do it. And it's just really, really nice.

Michael Reynolds:

Yeah.

Allissa Haines:

So yeah. Use a password manager. My quick tip is maybe help someone get vaccinated.

Michael Reynolds:

Oh, I love that.

Allissa Haines:

Yeah. Here's the thing. I'm so tied in to all the COVID stuff happening, all the business relief and all of the vaccination stuff, and the health related stuff, because I'm a practitioner who puts my hands on bodies, so I have to have some awareness of what's going on. And even the daily numbers in my state, I forget that there are people who don't watch the news, and people who have avoided any conversations about vaccine because all of their relatives are so crazy polarized one way or the other. And there's people who just prefer to not be in the know, but at this point not being in the know could be dangerous.

Allissa Haines:

So I realized when I was visiting a friend a couple of weeks ago, and by visiting, I mean dropping off some birthday presents on their front porch and talking to them outside for a little while, and they had a friend over. So we're all 10 feet apart chatting in the backyard. And the friend's friend mentioned that she was not registering to get vaccinated because her mom told her that a whole bunch of people are dying from it. And mind you, this was a couple of weeks ago before the whole Johnson & Johnson pause and things. And she also had been told by her husband that they inject you with the actual virus, and that's what this vaccine is, which is the opposite of what this vaccine is. So I was like, oh, well, okay, let me tell you a little bit what an R, pardon me, an MRNA vaccine is, in a very brief not... I dumbed it down for my own needs, because I still don't fully comprehend it. But I know enough to know that it's not actually shooting the virus into your body.

Allissa Haines:

And she had been told that people reacting to the second vaccine was an allergic reaction and not evidence of your body actually creating a response, and a defense to this thing. So I told her about that. And then she also didn't know how to get the vaccine. Do I have to call my doctor? No, no, no. And I right then I texted her the link to preregister with the state, because that's how my state's doing it. Pre-register they call you as soon as your group is up and get you an appointment as soon as there's an appointment available. And I realized after that conversation with her, that a lot of people didn't know they could preregister with Massachusetts, and that then the state would reach out and say, click here to make an appointment, we've got a dose for you.

Allissa Haines:

So by the time I left the house she was pre-registered. And on top of the pre-registration now, because it's open to everybody in Massachusetts, if you can get a spot at a private pharmacy before the state has a spot for you at the big vaccination sites, you can just do that. You can do that first. So I reached out to two, when I saw that a whole bunch of appointments opened up at various pharmacies in my area yesterday, I reached out to two people, and it was awkward because it's people I wouldn't, I'm not really, well, I don't want to say not really close to because one of them was my ex-husband, and my other one is my son-in-law, and I reached out, I was like, do you guys have your appointments yet? And they're both like, no. And I'm like, if I can get you an appointment for your area on Saturday will you go? And they both said yes.

Allissa Haines:

And then I got their license numbers and I got their insurance information, and their dates of birth, and I scheduled vaccination appointments. So now by in a month all of the adults in my grandson's household are going to be vaccinated, and I will be able to safely hug my grandson again. And it was not hard because I was at my computer and I had learned how to do it. So if you are proficient in tech skills, and also know how to get a vaccination appointment in your state, and in your area, maybe do a little legwork and talk to your friends, go through your texts, go through the history of texts in your phone. And those are all people you know well enough to text, ask them if they have made their appointments. And if they need help, help them. And maybe that means driving someone to their appointment. Maybe that means sending someone a really, there's a bunch of really great short little videos out there describing what this vaccine is, and how it works.

Allissa Haines:

So maybe you can encourage someone get vaccinated, and maybe you can help them actually get the shot. And that is my quick tip.

Michael Reynolds:

That's a really good reminder, because you're right. You and I are so plugged into everything. And then so many people are so not plugged into anything. So I just forget that there are people that just aren't paying attention to anything.

Allissa Haines:

Yeah. And you know what? Sometimes I really envy people who can just put their head down and do the things they need to do and not get distracted by other things. So rock on. This is not a judgment, it was just a statement. I would like to be like you one day. And if I am, I hope there is someone who is like me now, who nudges me and says, Hey, did you know this is happening, FYIs? And yeah. So, that's it. If you have questions, if you want to tell me gently how I was a hundred percent wrong about everything I said today, or any other day, you can email us at podcast@massagebusinessblueprint.com. And if you, I forgot what else. Oh, oh, oh, if you like our podcast, if you could tell the world, that would be great.

Allissa Haines:

If you could leave a review on whatever platform you are listening to this podcast on, if it's Apple podcasts, or Stitcher, or Spotify, or, I don't know any other place, please tell the world. If you have a friend who you think could benefit from this information, maybe show them how to listen to podcasts on their device, that would be really nice. And that's all that I have to say. You can visit us at massagebusinessblueprint.com to learn how to be a member, or just check out all of our free resources and blog posts, or maybe even join the community like I said. Thanks to all of our sponsors. And thank you, Michael, everyone have a wonderful day.

Michael Reynolds:

Thanks everyone.

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